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Thursday, October 6 • 11:00am - 12:30pm
Ingenuity and the Shaping of New Participation Trajectories: Examining Connected Learning through joint mediated practices in the home.

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Abstract
‘Formal’ learning environments are often rife with tensions between everyday expertise and school-based knowledge, particularly for youth from nondominant communities. The scholars in this session approach learning as a syncretic process that brings together everyday and academic learning (Gutiérrez, 2014). To develop an understanding of how syncretic processes of connected learning develop in youth and adults, we examine connected learning “as movement” (Gutierrez, 2008) across multiple sites, ways of knowing, relationships among peers, mentors and family members, and youths’ interests.  We find that nondominant communities in our study employ creativity and ingenuity to expand the possibilities of their current circumstances and shape new participation trajectories.

Objectives of session
This structured poster session consists of poster presentations from a MacArthur Foundation Connected Learning Research Network project that studies how youth and families develop and leverage their repertoires of practice (Gutiérrez & Rogoff, 2003) across the home and within an informal learning context. The objectives of this session are to understand:  1) how to design ecologies that include learning practices that are organized around both everyday and school-based forms of expertise; 2) how children and families engage in joint activity with digital media, 3) how the social organization of activity in multiple contexts shapes and mobilizes media use, interests, and practices, and 4) how home media, language and literacy ecologies and ideologies affect connected learning.

Overview of presentation
This presentation is the first time that collaborative research stemming from this long-standing Connected Learning Research Network project is taking a case study approach, by family, to highlight the variations and regularities of the learning and movement across homes whose youth participate in a designed afterschool program. To develop an understanding of how syncretic processes of connected learning develop in youth and adults, we examined connected learning “as movement” (Gutierrez, 2008) across multiple sites, ways of knowing, relationships among peers, mentors and family members, and youths’ interests. ‘Formal’ learning environments are often rife with tensions between everyday expertise and school-based knowledge, particularly for youth from nondominant communities. The scholars in this session approach learning as a syncretic process that brings together everyday and academic learning.. Such an approach seeks to hold the tension between the everyday and the formal to underscore the idea that expansive and meaningful learning relies on their mutual relation.    

Scholarly Significance
This study provides important new insights into the ways we have traditionally understood varying participation structures in youth media engagement, particularly within families in “tight circumstances” (McDermott, 2010). In our work, we examine the ways in which interactions and social practices with others shape participation with digital media - or what researchers are terming “joint media engagement” (Takeuchi & Stevens, 2011) - as a fruitful way of understanding how to broaden and expand digital media practices for connected learning. We find that nondominant communities in our study employ creativity and ingenuity to expand the possibilities of their current circumstances and shape new participation trajectories.  We attended to the ways youth and families reorganized ordinary practices with digital media to re-purpose tools and their possibilities. We attended to the ways youth and families reorganized ordinary practices with digital media to re-purpose tools and their possibilities. To better understand these phenomena, we employed the analytical concept of “inventos” (Gutiérrez, 2013; Jacobs-Fantauzzi, 2003; Schwartz & Gutiérrez, 2013), or the ways in which nondominant communities engage their creativity and ingenuity to create everyday objects for learning.



Speakers
DD

Daniela DiGiacomo

Univeristy of Colorado
KG

Kris Gutiérrez

Professor, University of California, Berkeley
JH

Jennifer Higgs

Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Berkeley
PJ

Patrick Johnson

Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Berkeley
EM

Elizabeth Mendoza

Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Berkeley


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Doheny Ballroom

Attendees (27)