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Wednesday, October 5
 

8:15am

Shuttle Pick Up: Hotel Irvine to Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:15 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach outside the valet area around 8:30 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center.  

Wednesday October 5, 2016 8:15am - 8:30am
Hotel Irvine

8:30am

Shuttle Pick Up: Fairmont to UCI (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:15 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach outside the valet area around 8:30 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center.  

Wednesday October 5, 2016 8:30am - 8:45am
Fairmont Newport Beach

9:00am

Shuttle Pick Up: Hotel Irvine to Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 9:00 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach, outside the valet area around 9:15 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center. 

Wednesday October 5, 2016 9:00am - 9:15am
Hotel Irvine

9:15am

Shuttle Pick Up: Fairmont to UCI (Loop)
Loop: A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 9:00 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach, outside the valet area around 9:15 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center. 

Wednesday October 5, 2016 9:15am - 9:30am
Fairmont Newport Beach

9:30am

Preconference Workshops (Separate Registration Required): Learning Analytics, Connected Courses, Maker Programs, Game Design and more!

An all new conference “geek out” day offers deep dives into hands-on workshops, mini-courses, and working sessions with top experts in the field. Topics range from courses in media making, learning analytics, program evaluation, and game design, to working sessions focused on delving into cutting edge problems in research and practice.

Each workshop will accept a limited number of participants.  Main Conference passes do not include workshop registration.

You still have time to purchase your pre-conference workshop registration pass! The deadline is August 8, 2016.

SCHEDULE • OCTOBER 5 • WEDNESDAY

9:00am – 9:30am Welcome Pre-Conference Workshop Attendees (Foyer)

Half Day Workshops - Morning  

9:30am – 12:30pm Transmedia Worldbuilding for Civic Engagement (Separate Registration Required)
Speakers: Gabriel Peters-Lazaro, Sangita Shresthova

Full Day Workshops:

9:30am – 5:00pm
 Capturing Connected Learning When and Where it Happens: A Workshop on Program Evaluation (SeparateRegistration Required)
Speakers: Vera Michalchik, William Penuel, Nick Wilson

9:30am – 5:00pm Crafting Connected Courses (Separate Registration Required)
Speakers: Alan Levine, Justin Reich

9:30am – 5:00pm Designing Youth Participatory Action Research Pathways: Toward Collaborative Inquiry, Participatory Culture, andSocial Justice (Separate Registration Required)
Speakers: Danielle Filipiak, Antero Garcia, Nicole Mirra

9:30am – 5:00pm Learning Analytics in Informal Spaces (Separate Registration Required)
Speakers: Charles Lang, Caitlin K. Martin, Nichole Pinkard

9:30am – 5:00pm Power Brokers: Building Youth Social Capital through Connected Learning (Full)
Speakers
: Brigid Barron, Philip Bell, Dixie Ching, Mimi Ito

11:00am – 11:15am Break

12:30pm – 2:00pm Lunch (Included with Pre-conference registration)

3:00pm – 3:15pm Break

 


Speakers
BB

B. Barron

Professor of Education, Stanford
avatar for Philip Bell

Philip Bell

Associate Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development, University of Washington College of Education
Philip Bell pursues a cognitive and cultural program of research across diverse environments focused on how people learn in ways that are personally consequential to them. He is an associate professor of the Learning Sciences at the University of Washington and the Geda and Phil Condit Professor of Science and Mathematics Education, and he directs the ethnographic and design-based research of the Everyday Science and Technology Group... Read More →
DF

Danielle Filipiak

PhD Candidate, English Education, Teachers College, Columbia University
NM

Nicole Mirra

Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at El Paso
WP

William Penuel

Professor, University of Colorado Boulder
avatar for Gabriel Peters-Lazaro

Gabriel Peters-Lazaro

Assistant Professor, USC School of Cinematic Arts
Gabriel Peters-Lazaro is an assistant professor of practice in the Media Arts + Practice Division at the USC School of Cinematic Arts where he researches, designs and produces digital media for innovative learning. As a member of the Media, Activism and Participatory Politics (MAPP) project he works to develop participatory media resources and curricula to support new forms of civic education and engagement for young people. He helped create... Read More →
avatar for Justin Reich

Justin Reich

Research Scientist, Teaching Systems Lab at MIT
avatar for Nicholas Wilson

Nicholas Wilson

Educational Programs Associate, Stanford University


Wednesday October 5, 2016 9:30am - 5:30pm
TBA

5:45pm

Shuttle Pick Up: UCI to Hotel Irvine/Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the side of Aldrich Hall (by the flag poles). The shuttle will depart promptly at 5:45 PM and will stop at the Hotel Irvine and Fairmont Newport Beach. 

Wednesday October 5, 2016 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Aldrich Hall (By Flagpoles)

8:00pm

Shuttle Pick Up: UCI to Hotel Irvine/Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the side of Aldrich Hall (by the flag poles). The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:00 AM and will stop at the Hotel Irvine and Fairmont Newport Beach. 

Wednesday October 5, 2016 8:00pm - 8:30pm
Aldrich Hall (By Flagpoles)
 
Thursday, October 6
 

8:00am

Shuttle Pick Up: Hotel Irvine (Direct to UCI)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:00 AM and travel directly to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center. 

Thursday October 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:15am
Hotel Irvine

8:00am

Charging Station
Need a place to charge your laptop or a quiet place to work? Check out the Crescent Bay AB room.

Thursday October 6, 2016 8:00am - 5:00pm
Crescent Bay AB

8:20am

Shuttle Pick Up: Fairmont (Direct to UCI)
The Fairmont is providing a courtesy shuttle to UCI. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:20 AM and travel directly to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center. 

Thursday October 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:35am
Fairmont Newport Beach

8:40am

Shuttle Pick Up: Hotel Irvine to Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:40 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach outside the entrance area around 8:55 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center.  

Thursday October 6, 2016 8:40am - 8:55am
Hotel Irvine

8:55am

Shuttle Pick Up: Fairmont to UCI (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:40 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach outside the entrance area around 8:55 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center.  

Thursday October 6, 2016 8:55am - 9:10am
Fairmont Newport Beach

9:00am

Constance Steinkuehler: What is the Intellectual Culture of Games?

Games and learning expert Constance Steinkuehler will discuss the promises and tensions around game-based learning amid the larger context of educational change. While the use of games in learning has become more accepted in some places than it was a decade ago, it remains controversial in many places because of larger debates around screen time and the relative importance and place of out-of-school learning. All the while, young people are using games to engage in compelling intellectual, interest-driven forms of learning. What is the intellectual life of games online? Young people can pick up valuable skills useful in the classroom, but will game-based learning become more broadly accepted in formal education?How do games play a role in interest-driven learning? How will these issues get resolved?

About Constance:

Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact.

Constance’s current research interests include neuroscience and games (particularly in the areas of attention and emotional and social well-being), learning analytics (informal scientific reasoning, problem-solving, and the role of failure), and mixed methods (game community discourse and literacy).

Constance Steinkuehler, University of Wisconsin–Madison


 


Speakers
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Doheny Ballroom

10:30am

Break
Coffee provided in foyer area.

Thursday October 6, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Foyer

11:00am

Making a Difference: Design strategies to engage underrepresented communities in maker spaces
Despite increasing research that making matters--including evidence that through making activities youth take on new identities as capable creators, innovators, and producers, develop technological fluencies, and widen their knowledge network and increase social capital--and despite increasing opportunities for making in different kinds of learning environments, there remain stark inequities in terms of who is participating. This panel brings together researchers and designers to share strategies for recruiting, engaging, and sustaining participation in material and digital making opportunities from youth from underrepresented communities. Importantly, these design ideas take an asset perspective, focusing on learning from, building on, and designing with focal communities. The panel will consist of four presentations and time for moderated questions and discussion. Each presentation will share their focal design challenge, their unique strategy (representing levels of community, family, individual participation), and successes and challenges related to implementation:

1. Dispatching mobile vans to activate communities in urban computing deserts: Mapping code-related, face-to-face programs Chicago revealed the majority to be located downtown in a nonresidential area. Neighborhoods of working-class families or families of color had few similar opportunities, and there were numerous barriers to those youth accessing opportunities downtown. In an effort to combat these “computing deserts,” DYN formed the Mobile Van initiative to bring trained mentors, laptops, and digital making curriculum to community centers that serve traditionally underrepresented families located in areas with little to no informal computing opportunities.

2. Supporting teaching artists as facilitators in public museum spaces: As we think about designing for public participation in our museum makerspace, MAKESHOP, we strongly focus on the quality of facilitation and think about productive professional support for facilitation. We currently are engaged collaboratively with makerspace teaching artists to identify and reflect on productive facilitation and learner interactions. For maker-based learning experiences, in general, we think that the need for facilitation to respond to local audiences, resources, and priorities is vital for issues of equity and inclusion.

3. Building family engagement through creative workshops with parents: Parents can play many roles to support their children's pathways through making opportunities. In Family Creative Learning workshops, we invite children and parents to create and learn together using technologies like Scratch programming language and MaKey MaKey invention kit. Families build coding and electronic projects, and build relationships and identities as creators and makers. We collaborate with community-based organizations who serve low-income communities to ensure the workshops are relevant and meaningful to families in their communities.

4. Designing recruitment flyers and dispatch channels that acknowledge the needs and goals of diverse families: To truly broaden participation, we need to not only design quality programs, but also work to develop and understand recruiting strategies that can encourage young people and families who are not already engaged to participate. The specifics of such efforts, even for programs that have been successful in recruiting, are often undocumented. We share recommendations and results in this area, including close attention to language and imagery to engage families from non-dominant populations; and redundant, targeted, channels of distribution, utilizing online networks and local organizations.


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay D

11:00am

Get Creative with Coding: Dance, Sports, and Other Interests

Join this hands-on session to find out how you can engage youth in creating their own interactive projects based on their hobbies and interests. Try a new way to get started with coding using a Scratch “microworld” - a small set of coding blocks you can snap together online to program your own interactive projects. Choose from a variety of interest areas, including dance, fashion, comedy, music, and sports. After exploring Scratch microworlds, share your experience and brainstorm ways you could adapt these activities to connect with the interests of young people you work with. We will share what we’ve learned introducing Scratch to young people within libraries and other environments. Bring a laptop to dig into Scratch during the session.

The Coding for All team (Scratch Team at the MIT Media Lab, DML Research Hub at University of California Irvine; and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University) are exploring and creating more interest-based pathways into computational fluency, both on- and offline, particularly for youth from underrepresented groups in computing. Because informal learning spaces, like libraries, are powerful spaces for providing access and a supportive social context to cultivate the connected learning of youth, informal educators are ideal facilitators for workshops on Scratch and other digital media projects. Computational fluency is widely recognized as a key digital literacy, and Scratch can enable youth to create, design, and express themselves in new and empowering ways and can expand future career and life opportunities. And by tapping into the expertise of teens who may already be experienced with Scratch, informal learning spaces can empower youth to take on greater roles in their library communities.



Speakers
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Moran Tsur

Moran Tsur

Grad Student, MIT Media Lab


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay B

11:00am

The Myth of the Magical Device: Refocusing on what needs redefining

The purpose of this presentation is to help educators develop a more sophisticated approach to technology integration in the classroom known as the Invisible iPad approach, which places emphasis on thoughtful and intentional uses of technology that lead to significant learning outcomes for students. The approach employed, known as the Invisible iPad approach uses a series strategies to allow educators to better understand how various technology processes can best support students and their learning experiences. Attendees will gain knowledge to better assess the purpose of technology, and then the focus on what types of iPad applications will lead to more meaningful learning outcomes. Moreover, participants will learn how to create learning experiences that transcend the four walls of their classroom.  In this presentation, attendees will be shown examples of various lessons that use the Invisible iPad approach in grades K-20 with artifacts of learning that demonstrate how technology can help develop and enhance 21st-Century skills such as Verbal and Visual Communication, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Language Acquisition, Organization, Collaboration, Creativity, and Higher Order Thinking. The final products of learning shared will clearly demonstrate how technology increases engagement, personalizes learning, and make student’s educational experiences more meaningful, memorable, and relevant to their lives.

During the presentation, we will review the TPACK and SAMR models to help the audience understanding how technology integration can positively impact them on both a professional and personal level. Both models will be critiqued for their lack of focus on student learning. The talk will then shift to the Invisible iPad approach which places student learning at the center of the integration process rather than solely on teacher behavior and practice, and the application of technological tools. The audience will be shown artifacts of learning from various K-12 classrooms to show the process and practical applications of the Invisible iPad Approach.

As the presentation progresses, attendees will engage in a design thinking challenge - how can we facilitate learning experiences that better support student voice and choice?

The presenters will capture all of the ideas and use Book Creator to capture the ideas and create an interactive publication that will be shared with the attendees after the conference. This publication will have key sections that focus on a) Challenges and fears with technology integration, b) A general “Bright Spot Ideas” of how technology can support classroom learning, and c) A specific of How can technology better support student voice and choice.


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay E

11:00am

Information, Imagination and Action: Entry points into participatory politics

2016 is an interesting moment to consider the role of media in public life. Deciphering the sea of competing messages, engaging in public discourse, and mobilizing people and resources--practices of participatory politics (Kahne, Middaugh & Allen, 2015; Soep, 2014) all require digital literacies--the ability to access information, and analyze, generate and reflect on online content (Hobbs, 2011).  

For urban youth, the urgency of participatory politics at a time of national conversations about immigration, economic inequality, and police brutality is clear. While some find their way to participatory politics through informal means--interest driven communities (Kahne, Lee & Feezell, 2013), for others, opportunities need to be cultivated. The considerable inequity defining Internet use, with higher income individuals more likely to produce media and lower income individuals to consume it (Schradie, 2011), reinforces this need. The tendency of under-resourced schools to use technology to practice basic skills may further exacerbate this divide (Gray, L., Thomas, N. & Lewis, L., 2010).

This panel considers three efforts to cultivate the skills and motivations for youth engagement in participatory politics and highlights three critical components of the process of moving towards empowered engagement. All take place in urban settings with constrained technology and educational resources. The first study examines digital civic literacy interventions in Oakland high schools. The second describes Youth Radio Interactive’s work engaging teams of youth to develop and launch civic apps. The final study introduces the importance of imagination as a critical link between literacy and action. Each project explores an entry point--literacy, imagination, action--into participatory politics.

The panel’s work challenges the notion that youth civic development follows a linear trajectory from literacy to action. These phases of digital civic engagement are both autonomous and speak to each other over time, contributing to the development of empowered civic identities. In each phase, the integration of digital media into learning environments produced common themes. First, we observe shifts in attitudes toward learning, with youth at each phase noting the importance of persistence. Second, these practices created opportunities for agency, with students at each phase noting a stronger sense of ownership and responsibility for their learning. Third, in each phase iteration was a critical component of effective practice, with educators often working within numerous constraints.

During the panel, the projects will highlight how each relates to the three key themes and will share key strategies for integrating education for participatory politics within the constraints of urban learning settings. The presentations will speak to the importance of providing these opportunities and share lessons for practice. A youth participant from Youth Radio Interactive will provide commentary on the benefits and challenges of such efforts.   

Discussant Nicole Mirra will lead a discussion of how these projects inform our understanding of promoting equity in participatory politics.  

Presentations

1. ""The Impact of Small Scale Digital Literacy Interventions in Urban High School Classrooms”

2. “iImagine New Civic Realities: Building Digital Civic Imagination in Urban Classrooms”

3. ""Mobilizing Civic Media: Youth Making Apps to Make Change.

+ Youth Radio Interactive Intern (TBD)

Moderators
NM

Nicole Mirra

Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at El Paso

Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay A

11:00am

Ingenuity and the Shaping of New Participation Trajectories: Examining Connected Learning through joint mediated practices in the home.

Abstract
‘Formal’ learning environments are often rife with tensions between everyday expertise and school-based knowledge, particularly for youth from nondominant communities. The scholars in this session approach learning as a syncretic process that brings together everyday and academic learning (Gutiérrez, 2014). To develop an understanding of how syncretic processes of connected learning develop in youth and adults, we examine connected learning “as movement” (Gutierrez, 2008) across multiple sites, ways of knowing, relationships among peers, mentors and family members, and youths’ interests.  We find that nondominant communities in our study employ creativity and ingenuity to expand the possibilities of their current circumstances and shape new participation trajectories.

Objectives of session
This structured poster session consists of poster presentations from a MacArthur Foundation Connected Learning Research Network project that studies how youth and families develop and leverage their repertoires of practice (Gutiérrez & Rogoff, 2003) across the home and within an informal learning context. The objectives of this session are to understand:  1) how to design ecologies that include learning practices that are organized around both everyday and school-based forms of expertise; 2) how children and families engage in joint activity with digital media, 3) how the social organization of activity in multiple contexts shapes and mobilizes media use, interests, and practices, and 4) how home media, language and literacy ecologies and ideologies affect connected learning.

Overview of presentation
This presentation is the first time that collaborative research stemming from this long-standing Connected Learning Research Network project is taking a case study approach, by family, to highlight the variations and regularities of the learning and movement across homes whose youth participate in a designed afterschool program. To develop an understanding of how syncretic processes of connected learning develop in youth and adults, we examined connected learning “as movement” (Gutierrez, 2008) across multiple sites, ways of knowing, relationships among peers, mentors and family members, and youths’ interests. ‘Formal’ learning environments are often rife with tensions between everyday expertise and school-based knowledge, particularly for youth from nondominant communities. The scholars in this session approach learning as a syncretic process that brings together everyday and academic learning.. Such an approach seeks to hold the tension between the everyday and the formal to underscore the idea that expansive and meaningful learning relies on their mutual relation.    

Scholarly Significance
This study provides important new insights into the ways we have traditionally understood varying participation structures in youth media engagement, particularly within families in “tight circumstances” (McDermott, 2010). In our work, we examine the ways in which interactions and social practices with others shape participation with digital media - or what researchers are terming “joint media engagement” (Takeuchi & Stevens, 2011) - as a fruitful way of understanding how to broaden and expand digital media practices for connected learning. We find that nondominant communities in our study employ creativity and ingenuity to expand the possibilities of their current circumstances and shape new participation trajectories.  We attended to the ways youth and families reorganized ordinary practices with digital media to re-purpose tools and their possibilities. We attended to the ways youth and families reorganized ordinary practices with digital media to re-purpose tools and their possibilities. To better understand these phenomena, we employed the analytical concept of “inventos” (Gutiérrez, 2013; Jacobs-Fantauzzi, 2003; Schwartz & Gutiérrez, 2013), or the ways in which nondominant communities engage their creativity and ingenuity to create everyday objects for learning.



Speakers
DD

Daniela DiGiacomo

Univeristy of Colorado
KG

Kris Gutiérrez

Professor, University of California, Berkeley
JH

Jennifer Higgs

Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Berkeley
PJ

Patrick Johnson

Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Berkeley
EM

Elizabeth Mendoza

Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Berkeley


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Doheny Ballroom

12:30pm

Lunch
On your own! Explore great eats around UC Irvine.

Thursday October 6, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Museums, Libraries and Connected Learning: Emerging models and promising practice

Our session will include select IMLS grantees to be identified that can illustrate for attendees compelling models for engaging youth through connected learning models.  Since 2010, IMLS has supported more than $10 million in discretionary grants for participatory programs in museums and libraries across the nation, as well as related research and professional development.  Selected projects might include the  Making and Learning framework (Pittsburgh Children's Museum),  YouMedia online professional learning community (National Writing Project), or others.  All grantees have undergone a rigorous peer review process.

IMLS program officers and grantees will share emerging models and promising practices of how our nation's museums and libraries are engaging youth through hands-on, minds-on programs.  We'll share on a new model for the intentional design and execution of makerspaces developed in cooperation with the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh, as well as an online professional learning community for practitioners working with youth managed by the National Writing Project.   Ample time will be provided for questions and discussion.

IMLS program officers and grantees will share emerging models and promising practices of how our nation's museums and libraries are engaging youth through hands-on, minds-on programs.  We'll share an emerging model for the intentional design and execution of makerspaces developed in cooperation with the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh, as well as an online professional learning community for practitioners working with youth managed by the National Writing Project.

Learning Objective 1: The participants will learn about the scope and nature of support that IMLS provides for participatory learning and connected learning in libraries and museums nationwide and how that aligns with the agency’s mission and funding priorities

Learning Objective 2:  The participants will understand the three components of the framework to support learning in library and museum and library makerspaces.

Learning Objective 3: The attendees will discern the link between the framework components and the learning opportunities in which libraries and museums in hope to engage participants, as well as how to engage with peers in an online professional learning community to refine their practice.



Speakers
CM

Candice Mack

Senior Librarian, Systemwide Teen Services, Los Angeles Public Library
CM

Cheryl McCallum

Director of Education, Children's Museum of Houston


Thursday October 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay B

2:00pm

Engaging Communities and Classrooms: Empowering youth through game and databased interventions

This workshop will introduce the concept of our Engagement Lab learning playlist, which explores how to use three technological tools to playfully engage communities and classrooms in civic interventions. The three tools, DataBasic, Emerging Citizens & @Stake, are positioned to engage users in playful processes around data, exercise, and deliberation. Each tool will be introduced through its pedagogical framework, technological development, and learner application. Participants will then engage with each tool, and we will conduct reflections of their experiences. The goal for this interactive session is to share how game and data based methodologies can engage students’ expression, creation, and sharing of civic media that contributes positively to daily life. We will specifically focus on how these three game and data based interventions can create powerful community-centered, maker-based learning experiences that harness simple web based modes of communication to teach about expression, agency and voice.  The three tools in our playlist are:

@Stake is a digital role-playing game that fosters democracy, empathy, and creative problem solving for civic issues. Players take on various roles,  create questions based on real life issues, and deliberate over solutions that incorporate multiple stakeholder appeal. All participants pitch their ideas under a time limit and one of the players, “The Decider” chooses who has the best idea, awarding points to the winner. @Stake facilitates creative ideas, empathy, and learning about local issues through a playful, safe approach.

Emerging Citizens is a suite of digital multiplayer games and media literacy curriculums that teach students how to critique and create civic media. Through play, students develop skills to engage with a changing media landscape that blurs the lines between public and private, entertainment and advocacy, and information and advertising. Each game incorporates content that encourages students to engage with culturally and politically relevant topics that affect their daily lives while focusing on a specific 21st digital modality (Hashtags, Memes, and Hyperlinking). Emerging Citizens is accompanied by activity guides and curriculum materials to help educators connect the games to real-world skill-sets and pressing cultural issues.

DataBasic is a free suite of easy-to-use web tools that introduce concepts of working with data to beginners. These simple tools make it easy to work with data in fun ways, so you can learn how to find great stories to tell. WordCounter analyzes your text and tells you the most common words and phrases. WTFcsv provides the first step in CSV analyzation by characterizing each column's data type and contents so that you can ask more questions. SameDiff compares two or more text files using a cosine similarity algorithm to rate whether the documents are really similar or totally different. DataBasic includes video tutorials and activity guides to help teachers and community leaders introduce the platform to their participants.



Speakers
avatar for Jordan Pailthorpe

Jordan Pailthorpe

Engagement Lab
Jordan is a producer and project manager who specializes in production of digital games for social change. Jordan has led the creative production of Risk Horizon and Unlocking Health, tow digital games made for the World Bank, as well as other web application based projects such as the recently launched DataBasic. He currently manages the UNDP Game Changer Fellowship Program, the Handwashing with Ananse Evaluation in Ghana, and the production... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay D

2:00pm

Building Informal Learning Networks

Abstracts are available here: http://dml2016.dmlhub.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Building-Informal-Learning-Networks.pdf, and are attached as a resource file below. 

Individual Session Compelling Models
241 Squad Goals: How Youth Connect, Learn and PowerUp!
Ariam Mogos | Global Kids| @aamogos


Individual Session Compelling Models - 
194 Mentoring 20%: A new model for brokering expertise in Connected Learning spaces
Wade Berger | John G. Shedd Aquarium | @wadeatshedd

Individual Session Compelling Models
198  We’ll bring the bagels: The real work of starting, building, and sustaining collaborative networks
Ryan Coon | The Sprout Fund | @sproutfund

Individual Session Compelling Models
221 Computational thinking development in programming clubs: a project design for public elementary schools in Brazil
Carolina Rodeghiero | Universidade Católica de Pelotas (Catholic University of Pelotas) & UCPel and CocTec (research group) | @CarolRodeghiero

Individual Session Research
142 Connected Learning in Public Libraries
Katie Davis | University of Washington | @katiebda

Individual Session Compelling Models - museum games
217 How to Organize a Serious Game Jam in 87 Easy-to-Follow Steps
Rik Panganiban | California Academy of Sciences | @riktheranger

 


Speakers
avatar for Ariam Mogos

Ariam Mogos

Director of Online Leadership Programs, Global Kids
avatar for Rik Panganiban

Rik Panganiban

Senior Instructional Design Lead, California Academy of Sciences
Digital learning, youth development, instructional design, online learning, blended learning, afterschool, STEM learning



Thursday October 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay A

2:00pm

Researching Inclusive Program Design

Abstracts are available here: http://dml2016.dmlhub.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Researching-Inclusive-Program-Design-.pdf, and are attached as a resource file below. 

Individual Session Research
80 Making Innovators in Formal and Informal Learning Environments
Matt Rafalow University of California-Irvine @mrafalow

Individual Session Research
158 Gaming the System: Connected learning and parental support among non-dominant families in the CyberPatriot program
Melissa Brough | California State University, Northridge |  @broughest

Individual Session Research
72  Early, Often, & Different: Fostering Inclusive Spaces for Supporting Diverse Learning Pathways in Games & Technology
Amanda Ochsner | University of Southern California | @AmandaOchsner

Individual Session Research
238 Twine Workshop: Youth Making Games and Digital Stories
Kelly Tran | Arizona State University | @kellymtran

Individual Session Research
146 Mexican Boys and Digitally-Mediated Learning Interactions
Carlos Martínez-Cano | University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education | @hyperopic

Individual Session     Research      
157 “Everyday” Making and Engagement with STEM
Priyanka Parekh | Arizona State University    

 



Speakers
avatar for Amanda Ochsner

Amanda Ochsner

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California



Thursday October 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay E

2:00pm

Connecting Youth: Lessons from Five Years of Mixed Method DML Research

This session provides lessons learned from five years of mixed method fieldwork documenting a set of technologically-enhanced, educational interventions funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The initiative was advanced based on the assumption that technologically enhanced informal educational opportunities could potentially address challenges associated with the structural relationship between social background, including neighborhood context, and educational and occupational opportunities.  Progressive pedagogical approaches enhanced by new forms of digital technology were argued to be capable of improving outcomes of disadvantaged youth. The initiatives centered on schools, after-school enrichment programs and drop-in centers in Chicago and New York City. Over time, the programs in particular adopted a pedagogical model, Connected Learning, which stresses the importance of engaging under-resourced, non-dominant youth in ways that help them connect segments of their learning ecologies that are traditionally disconnected: interests, peer relationships, and opportunity. We present findings on positive outcomes associated with connected learning practices as well as opportunities and challenges around connected youth programming. The questions that we examine around technology, youth and education are arguably central to addressing the challenges and needs of 21st Century youth. In this session we’ll address the following themes: 1. Participation in the MacArthur Foundation's multifaceted educational initiatives exposed educators and administrators to new ideas, concepts, and tools that were designed to enhance their instructional practices. We’ll address how on-the-ground educators - operating as street-level bureaucrats - understood and implemented the core elements of the initiative. In particular, we’ll focus on their discourses and observed practices with respect to progressive pedagogy, technology and the intersection between technology and pedagogy. We’ll also unpack barriers to implementation and supports educators reported as important. 2. Youth participants in these programs as well as schools they attended are situated in particular neighborhood contexts that differ in structural characteristics, including exposure to crime and violence.  These neighborhood contexts structure youth access to formal and informal educational opportunities. We’ll explore the relationship between program participation, neighborhood context, social background, and educational opportunity. 3. We will address the extent to which youth who engage in these types of programs and schools have varying educational outcomes, including how these relationships vary by social network relationships and social background.  For example, we explore whether students from families with fewer resources, and neighborhoods with concentrated poverty and exposure to crime and violence, are particularly sensitive to the relationship between educational outcomes and the connected learning practices we observed. We will also identify how different measures of educational outcomes (e.g., self-reported attitudes and behaviors, traditional standardized tests and alternative assessments) are suggestive of the possibilities and limitations of the capacity for technologically-enhanced, progressive education to shape educational outcomes.


Speakers
RA

Richard Arum

Dean of the School of Education; Professor of Educ, University of California, Irvine
MM

Max Meyer

School Research Coordinator, New York University
EM

Emma Mishel

Doctoral Researcher, New York University


Thursday October 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Ballroom

2:00pm

CS4All, but why? A Framework for Examining the Purposes and Ideologies behind Computer Science Education Initiatives

As current momentum grows around expanding Computer Science education at the K-12 level, associated public policy narratives assume that we’ve addressed the core question: Why teach CS to all students? The presumed answer in public debates has been simple: Making sure kids are “job ready on day 1,” as President Obama stated in his announcement of the national CS for All (CS4All) initiative. In this panel, we present a project that aims to expand the vision of “Computer Science for All” to go beyond ‘job readiness’ rationales to include a range of purposes, including those currently receiving less attention in public discourse such as creative computation and critical or social justice-oriented approaches to technological production.

The current growth of K-12 CS education is arguably unprecedented. The federal government has increased funding through its Computer Science for All initiative, and cities across the country including Chicago, New York City and Los Angeles are following suit. Problems currently being discussed by stakeholders in CS4All initiatives are generally “technocratic” in nature (e.g., How do we find and train enough teachers? What tools should we use? What does the scope and sequence for the curriculum look like?) While those are important concerns to consider in order to meet the ambitious access-oriented goal driving these initiatives, those more “technocratic” questions cannot be answered fully without first addressing underlying questions about ideology: What are the purposes of bringing computer science education to all students? Why is CS ed important? How might it improve the futures of a wide-range of youth?

In this session, presenters will introduce a framework that can be used to analyze the purposes of a CS education program, curriculum or initiative, and create throughlines between how purposes line up with enacted pedagogies and policies. Developed through a participatory knowledge building process in collaboration with leading CS educators and organizations involved in the CS4All initiative in New York City, the framework provides a well-defined set of purposes for CS learning that can allow educators, administrators and policymakers to carefully consider how their current initiatives reflect different ideologies and assumptions.

The framework outlines the various arguments used to justify CS education, and the general rationale behind them. It then details what each argument implies in terms of enacted pedagogy, intended outcomes and envisioned future pathways for learners, providing examples that emerged through discussions with CS leaders and educators. Finally, the presenters will consider how different visions for computer science education relate to and might support each other within a larger ecosystem around CS learning, and make recommendations as to how robust CS learning ecosystems that speak to the range of CS purposes might be achieved.

By recognizing and validating the many visions undergirding CS education, we hope to ensure that CS4All initiatives meet the needs of diverse learners who themselves embody different orientations towards technology and computer science, have different gender, socio-economic, cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and who will face different challenges as they learn and leverage skills and knowledge in computer science

Speakers
avatar for Rafi Santo

Rafi Santo

Hive Research Lab/Indiana University
avatar for Sara Vogel

Sara Vogel

Doctoral Student, CUNY-Graduate Center
Computer science education visions, bilingual education, video game education in out-of-school-time


Thursday October 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay C

3:00pm

Break
Brief break to transition to 30 minute sessions.

Thursday October 6, 2016 3:00pm - 3:15pm
TBA

3:15pm

Hive Mapping Cooperative: Facilitating Collaborative Teen-Led Inquiry

The Hive Mapping Cooperative (HMC) developed in Chicago in the spring of 2014 as an effort to facilitate collaborative youth-led inquiry into human ecology and urban ecosystems by developing shared systems for teens from across the city to collect, analyze, visualize, and share georeferenced data using free and open-source mapping, data collection and data sharing tools. HMC was proposed to address the fact that many youth-serving organizations expressed interest in using digital mapping with students but lacked the resources or technical knowledge to do so. HMC sought to identify existing digital technologies that met three criteria: free open-source software, ease of training and use, and functionality allowing for meaningful data analysis. Partners desired to integrate collaborative mobile data collection, mapping, and visualization technologies to enrich (rather than replace) existing program foci.

This project has engaged multiple out-of-school time programs across a network of organizations and urban spaces (i.e. neighborhoods, parks, urban farms, forest preserves, and restored natural areas). HMC partners identified a range of technologies and developed curricular strategies for teens to collaborate on locally-relevant issues. HMC has worked to integrate open-source tools to allow teens to collaboratively document, make sense of, question, and imagine alternatives to existing nature-human, nature-nature, and human-human relationships and recognize maps as contested spaces. This session will provide an overview of the project, the range of digital technologies used, and the impact on youth engagement and learning.  Attendees will learn how the project has increased teen collaboration and relationship building across programs and organizations. The presenters will share how attendees can freely access project resources and begin integrating these resources into programming.



Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay C

3:15pm

Slow Meets Social Media: Out of Eden Learn

How can slowing down be used as a guiding principle for meaningful engagement on social media? How can slow looking, listening, and storytelling activities support both self-exploration and cross-cultural sensitivity and understanding? These kinds of questions are at the heart of Out of Eden Learn, an online global education program that connects youth (pre-K through high school) to take part in shared learning journeys.

 

The Out of Eden Learn curriculum consists of a series of offline activities and online exchanges between students on our custom-designed social media platform. These activities are designed around three core learning goals:  slowing down to observe the world carefully and to listen attentively to others; exchanging stories and perspectives related to people, place, and identity; reflecting on how individual lives connect to bigger human stories.  Out of Eden Learn is an educational companion to journalist Paul Salopek’s Out of Eden Walk - an epic, "slow journalism" project in which he is retracing on foot the migratory pathways of our ancestors out of Africa and across the globe. 

In this session, Carrie James will share an overview of Out of Eden Learn’s design principles and curriculum and selected examples of student work.

 


Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Doheny Ballroom

3:15pm

Using Rituals and Game Mechanics to Structure Collaborative Brainstorming

How do educators, artists, and technologists design a learning experience around ideation and brainstorming in order for youth to develop a successful collaborative project and narrative?  We invite you to explore with us how we can democratize the creative process using engaging game mechanics, structures, and constraints in order to create a starting point for collaborative projects as a component of project-based learning.  Participants must have a laptop (preferred), tablet or smart phone with internet.  

This session is based on the Eyebeam's Playable Fashion youth program, developed by Eyebeam alum residents Kaho Abe and Ramsey Nasser.  Playable Fashion explores the intersection between fashion, technology and gaming, where teens create their own games and custom wearable game controllers inspired by their personal narratives.  The program's curriculum is modular, designed to have a low barrier to entry and to be adaptable by educators of various backgrounds in different learning environments.  Eyebeam has hosted various focus groups of educators, game designers, artists, and engineers to capture best practices and models for teaching and scaling the Playable Fashion curriculum.  The DML Conference hands-on session will be a learning experience for both participants and facilitators.


Thursday October 6, 2016 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay A

3:15pm

Virtually Connecting as a Model for Transformative Learning
Virtually Connecting is a #connectedlearning community that is reshaping the ways we think about professional collegiality. In a traditional model of professional development, conferences have always been the key location to build conversations and connections. In the era of the conference hashtag and the meeting back channel, claims have been made that it is easier to keep up with conference conversations, even from afar. But despite the fact that knowledge is often shared via presentation slides and keynotes are often livestreamed online, this online sharing is still a distant second to the in-person experience. What is missing is the key opportunity to network and converse with people in between the scheduled conference events, the hallway conversations. What is difficult to experience from a distance is transformational learning that results from immersing yourself in a dialogue with co-learners who are talking about the very same things you care about.
A founding purpose of @VConnecting is to enliven virtual participation in academic conferences, widening access to a fuller conference experience by connecting onsite conference presenters with virtual participants in small groups. Using available technologies, virtual conference attendees can meet and talk with conference presenters. VC is a volunteer effort, and its ranks have grown considerably since Maha Bali & Rebecca Hogue founded/piloted VC in early 2015. Each session is recorded and live streamed, to allow additional virtual attendees to participate in the discussion by listening and asking questions via Twitter. At the heart of this effort is a commitment to building and strengthening relationships. Virtually Connecting helps people not only make new connections, but also make nascent connections stronger.
What is special about the emergence of Virtually Connecting as a new #connectedlearning community is the foundational commitment to equity and access when attempting to design new professional learning networks. Virtual Connecting is genuinely interested in lessening that gap between center and periphery, between local participant and distant observer. VC seeks to expand access to smart and dynamic conversations by including many kinds of learners. It is this kind of connecting that will make a difference by transforming our collective sense of collegiality, by opening up the entry points for new knowledge production, and by helping identify our shared purpose.
This panel will consider the current VC model as we share stories of VC programming and design. What does it mean to be collegial in the 21st century networked world? How have we designed VC conference engagement beyond a simple "report out" concept? How can we program for more integrated collaboration with colleagues offsite? What key design features of the VC model have worked thus far? What has not worked? How does online/networked virtual connecting inform actual teaching and learning practices? What work can VC do to close the gap between "the center" and "the periphery"?
This discussion will be conducted by colleagues both onsite at UC-Irvine and also off site via Virtual Connecting. Panelists include: -Mia Zamora, -Maha Bali, -Rebecca Hogue, -Alan Levine, -Andrea Rehn, -Autumn Caines, -Nadine Aboulmagd

Speakers
NA

Nadine Aboulmagd

The American University in Cairo
Hello, I'm the Online Content Developer at the Center for Learning and Teaching at AUC. I'm very interested in, and here to meet people to discuss; pedagogy, educational technology, digital pedagogy, instructional design, online & blended learning, and all things educational basically :) | My Twitter handle is @NadinneAbo. Give me a shout and let's start a conversation!
avatar for Maha Bali

Maha Bali

Associate Professor of Practice, The American University in Cairo
I'm a MOOCaholic and writeaholic, passionate about open, connected learning. Co-founder of virtuallyconnecting.org (join us during #dlrn) and edcontexts.org) write for us!) and columnist/editor at Hybrid Pedagogy (you probably already know us)
avatar for Autumm Caines

Autumm Caines

Associate Director of Academic Technology, Capital University
Hi! I'm Autumm Caines @autumm on Twitter and yep those are 2 m's. I'm the Associate Director of Academic Technology at Capital University in Columbus Ohio. I blog at http://autumm.edtech.fm I like to help people in Ed Tech connect with one another through this thing called Virtually Connecting which is a sort of movement or an idea more so than a technology or an organization - you can find out more at http://virtuallyconnecting.org/
avatar for Rebecca Hogue

Rebecca Hogue

PhD Candidate, University of Ottawa
I’m Rebecca J Hogue (@rjhogue). I’m a blogger (http://rjh.goingeast.ca, http://bcbecky.com, and http://goingeast.ca), a scholar, an educator, and aspiring writer. I'm a PhD Candidate at the University of Ottawa and an Associate Lecturer at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. I teach Emerging Technologies and Instructional Design online. My research and innovation interests are in the development of health literacy through peer-to-peer... Read More →
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor, English, Kean University
Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.


Thursday October 6, 2016 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay E

3:15pm

From Voice to Influence: The Youth and Participatory Politics Action Framework

Sixties activists insisted, the personal is political. Change-makers in the digital age get that idea, and one-up it with another rallying cry: the political is social and cultural. This principle brings opportunity and peril to young people seeking to be change-makers. Platforms, digital strategies, and individual civic agents need to take this principle seriously so that young people can learn to engage each other, and their allies, in high-quality, equitable, and effective participation in digital-age civics, activism, and politics. Young people need practices for navigating digital environments that actively support the secure development of their identities as participants in public spheres, so their civic and political engagement today doesn’t harm or haunt them later.
In this hands-on and interactive workshop, participants will learn about the Youth and Participatory Politics Action Framework, developed by MacArthur Foundation’s Youth Participatory Politics Research Network. Comprising ten principles, the goal of our framework is to help both educators and ordinary civic actors design successful–– i.e., effective, equitable, and self-protective––participation one step at a time Participants will discuss essential goals and strategies concerning the action framework against their concrete contexts. Multiple perspectives are welcome. This workshop is open to a wide audience, not only to researchers but also to platform designers, educators, and other practitioners.
1. Why does it matter to me?  (equity)
2. How much should I share?  (self-protection)
3. How do I make it about more than myself?  (equity)
4. Where do we start? (efficacy)
5. How can we make it easy and engaging for others to join in? (efficacy)
6. How do we get wisdom from crowds? (equity & self-protection)
7. How do we handle the downside of crowds?  (equity & self-protection)
8. How does raising our voices count as civic and political action?  (efficacy)
9. How do we get from voice to change? (efficacy)
10. How can we find allies? (efficacy)
WORKSHOP FORMAT
The workshop includes minimal lecturing for the introduction and maximal interactive sessions for inquiry practice among participants.  Participants will be asked to post any questions to an ad hoc online space, like Hackpads (http://www.hackpads.com), or on the wall using post-it sheets.  The overall structure involves the following:

  • Introductory presentation on Youth and Participatory Politics Action Framework

  • Breakout sessions

  • Participants form small groups by shared issues regarding the action framework.

  • An action-reflection rubric is distributed. The rubric can guide participants to connect their contexts and experiences effectively to the action framework. It can be also used to visualize their practice in a 3-D graph.

  • Participants discuss how they can redesign or improve their practice, what challenges are expected in such processes, and how to overcome them.

  • Group Presentation and Q & A

  • Participants review the questions contributed thorough the session, pick a few important ones (or, they can vote for the most desired questions), and discuss them.

  • Reflection and evaluation


Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay B

3:15pm

Open Portfolios: Capturing Voice, Process, Design, and Learning

As the education system makes steps forward in rethinking our outmoded ways of assessing learning, portfolios stand out as the strong option for providing real evidence of learning. More than that, they allow for youth voice to shine through. Whether portfolios serve as a true alternative to grades and test scores or as a supplement, they have caught traction and promise to serve as a means to broaden access for all learners to new college and career opportunities. And just as importantly, they reflect back one’s learning and growth.

Join Maker Ed's workshop session on open portfolios and engage in an opportunity to make, capture, and document. Consider how these experiences translate to the classroom, integrate with new and existing multimedia tools, and form the foundation of portfolio practices across the board. The workshop will include discussion around facilitation and offer up examples of what youth portfolios can look like. Learn more about our ongoing research as part of the Open Portfolio Project, in collaboration with Indiana University’s Creativity Labs, and together, we’ll design strategies for how youth can best showcase their learning.



Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay D

3:45pm

Break
Brief break to get to your 30 minute presentations!

Thursday October 6, 2016 3:45pm - 4:00pm
TBA

4:00pm

Deconstructing Disneyland': An Experiment in Theme Park-Based Media Literacy Education
A group of undergraduate students, university faculty and creative professionals at BYU are partnering to create a mobile app-based Alternate Reality Game that allows visitors to Disneyland to critically engage with (while still enjoying) the popular theme park. Users will go on scavenger hunts (using GPS technologies), uncover obscure and sometimes alarming elements of the park's design and history (using augment reality), and follow a fictional narrative which encourages them to take a closer, more critical, look at the park, its design, economics, ideology and history.

The app fills what we see as a gap in the field of media literacy education. For the last few decades, scholars and educators have developed theories and pedagogies to help students, and the public, to more critically engage with the media that surrounds "themed”movies and music, television and advertisements, games, social media and the internet. However, little effort has been made to see how these perspectives might be applied to place-based media experiences (like theme parks). Also, media education is often limited to particular contexts and populations classrooms and youth programs. The app gamifies the theme park experience, and in so doing invites a broader public to critically engage with Disneyland.

The app and accompanying research project draw upon analyses of Disneyland (Baudrillard, Marin), cultural and institutional critiques of Disney (Wasko, Giroux), and critical (and creative) explorations of public spaces (Benjamin, Whitman). The presentation will discuss these theoretical foundations, describe the ARG, and demonstrate some gameplay elements.

Speakers
BB

Brent Barson

Associate Professor, Brigham Young University
JP

Jeff Parkin

Professor, Brigham Young University


Thursday October 6, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay A

4:00pm

Launching the Mission: Admission Challenge

This session, Launching the Mission: Admission Challenge, outlines the one-year process of deploying an online game-based intervention to improve college-going practices for low-income high school students in communities throughout California. One of the primary motivators behind the Mission: Admission Challenge was to harness students' daily engagement with games and social media and to apply those influences to motivate, educate, and support students in applying to college and for financial aid. This panel brings together the diverse project partners in the gaming, college access, and research fields to discuss the many components that went into launching and sustaining the Mission: Admission Challenge. The panel highlights lessons learned through project implementation, research activities, student engagement, and project evaluation.

Panelists:
Researcher Perspective: Conceptualizing, Recruiting, and Iterating (Pullias Center for Higher Education, Los Angeles, CA) Dr. Amanda Ochsner will present a brief overview of the Mission: Admission Challenge, beginning with key motivators for the project and how the lead investigators initially conceptualized the research design. She will then describe the team's strategies for recruiting schools and making iterations throughout the initial implementation phase based on feedback from principals, counselors, and teachers. Ochsner will also share preliminary qualitative and quantitative findings from the first year of data collection.

Game Designer Perspective: Designing, Debugging, and Troubleshooting (USC Game Innovation Lab, Los Angeles, CA) Game designers Elizabeth Swensen and Sean Bouchard will describe the process of designing an updated version of the Mission: Admission game, highlighting changes made to ensure that the game was accessible and engaging for students across a diverse spectrum of access. Throughout the duration of the project, schools in the research sample experienced a variety of technology challenges, including limited access to reliable broadband, not having adequate supply of working computers, and inability to schedule students into computer labs. Swensen and Bouchard will describe their strategies for play testing, debugging, and troubleshooting with participating schools.

Digital Engagement Perspective: Incentivizing and Engaging (Get Schooled Foundation, New York, NY & Seattle, WA): Nourisha Wells from the Get Schooled Foundation will describe their group's role in engaging and incentivizing student and school participation in the Mission Admission Challenge. She will share information about how their organization's regional and national school-based competitions are designed to increase educational outcomes such as attendance, college application, and FAFSA completion rates. She will also discuss the process for integrating a game-based research intervention into its Challenge model to incentivize student and school engagement in research participation and data collection.

Evaluator Perspective: Advising and Evaluating (APA Consulting, Denver, CO): Abby McClelland from the evaluation team will outline their strategy for measuring the impact of the intervention and examining the effects the Mission: Admission Challenge had on students college-going efficacy, college knowledge, FAFSA completion, and college enrollment. In addition to analyzing key outcome measures, the external evaluation team is also responsible for designing the evaluation study to meets the What Works Clearinghouse standards.   


Moderators
ZC

Zoe Corwin

Associate Research Professor, USC

Speakers
AM

Abby McClelland

Associate, APA Consulting
avatar for Amanda Ochsner

Amanda Ochsner

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California
avatar for Nourisha Wells

Nourisha Wells

Director Digital Operations and Web Development, Get Schooled
Nourisha has more than 15 years experience in digital marketing and communications with a continued emphasis on the role of technology in achieving educational outcomes. She is very happy to combine her love of education; obsession with technology and the Internets; and heavy consumption of pop culture into the perfect way to spend her weekdays at Get Schooled. And she hopes to help change the landscape of public education in the process! In... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Doheny Ballroom

4:00pm

Smart Tech Use for Equity

Which uses of technology in schools help create equity, and which don’t? Our answers may surprise you. Our educator-led initiative, called Smart Tech Use for Equity, is engaging a diverse group of K-12 teachers who teach San Diego’s low-income students of color. Our goal? Identify uses of technology in schools that promote student learning, development and success versus uses that don’t.

The project asks teachers to be equity designers, exploring the potential and limitations of tech for enabling student thinking, learning, voice and achievement. We’re asking a critical question about our classroom efforts: Does this use of tech help support the full human talent development of every student and all groups of students? Or not?

In 2015, each of 10 founding teachers explored one tech use with their students, documented the effects for students, and shared their learning with other teachers. Our action research/documentation process, supported by Educator Innovator and Teaching Tolerance, was featured on the cover of Teaching Tolerance magazine this January. This year, leaders are engaging school-based groups of colleagues in the same process. We’ve developed this template for testing, documenting and publicly sharing the “smartness” of specific tech uses with equity in mind:
1. What’s your equity vision for students in your classroom?
2. What tech use did you experiment with to see if it could help achieve that vision?
3. What did you do with your students to test that use of tech, and how did it go? (Show the pros and cons for students.)
4. What’s your conclusion about how “smart” that tech use was for achieving your equity vision?

The process supports teachers to test and publicly share tech uses for equity. Founding teachers tested whether Explain Everything and iMovie could support English learners to communicate their scientific thinking; whether TodaysMeet and Padlet might support middle school students in deeper dialogues about literature (one did, one didn’t); and whether videoing/viewing third graders’ math explanations using an Ipad might build students’ ability to explain math concepts, for example (https://sites.google.com/site/smarttech4equity/). This year, teachers are testing/documenting whether hands-on or online “labs” in middle school science deepen scientific understanding; what counts as “smart tech use” in a library context; and whether a graphing app opens up or shuts down students’ understanding of graphs, for example. Beyond “glitzy apps,” we’ve realized something counterintuitive: Often, equity might require the simplest uses of tech that get students to talk, write and create.  

We think we’re on to a process supporting teachers to pursue big dreams for their classrooms that go far beyond more tech use. A key to making equity visions a reality is debating and documenting whether tech uses actually support students’ learning, participation, and deep comprehension in schools. In our presentation, educator leaders of Smart Tech Use for Equity will share our process, inviting more teachers to join us as equity designers.



Speakers
JA

Jeri Aring

3rd Grade Teacher, Chula Vista Hills Elementary School
avatar for Alicia Johal

Alicia Johal

Teacher, UCSD CREATE, Sweetwater UHSD
Alicia Johal, M. Ed is an 8th Grade Science Teacher and Curriculum Specialist in Sweetwater Union High School District. She has a passion for teaching science through real life application and critical thinking. As a Leading Edge Certified Professional Learning Leader and Apple Foundations Trainer, she has found success supporting English Language Learners and literacy through video creation and production in her classroom. She utilizes problem... Read More →


Thursday October 6, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay B

4:00pm

Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda
Learn about "best practices" in the pedagogy of teaching about propaganda as a form of media literacy education and explore a new online educational resource, Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda, a crowdsourced educational media platform for discussing the many new forms of propaganda we encounter as part of daily life. 

Critical thinking about propaganda and understanding propaganda's intent are crucial responsibilities of citizenship in the twenty-first century. But in recent years, teaching about propaganda has diminished in many educational settings. At the same time, rising levels of apathy and disengagement are combining with increasing levels of political polarization, here in the United State and all over the world. We are surrounded by more messages than ever with near-constant exposure to viral media, content marketing, advertising, the 24-hour news cycle, and an ever-expanding array of entertainment media, including music, TV shows, movies, video games, apps and social media like YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. With the significant volume of messages in our daily lives coming in so many forms and from so many different channels, it can be difficult to recognize new forms of contemporary propaganda. Entering into a discussion about contemporary propaganda invites us to think about the power of communication and our responsibilities as authors and audiences. It raises fresh questions about the use and potential impact of new media and technologies and invites us to scrutinize how propaganda thrives in the blurred boundaries between art, journalism and advocacy.

In this workshop, you will learn about "best practices" in the pedagogy of teaching about propaganda as a form of media literacy education. You'll get a chance to explore a new online educational resource, Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda, an online user-generated content website that helps high school and college students explore the subject of contemporary propaganda. At the website, users can upload, examine and discuss examples of propaganda from around the world. By participating in this workshop, you will gain the knowledge and skills you need to lead a professional development workshop for educators and launch a digital literacy initiative on analyzing contemporary propaganda in your community.

Speakers
avatar for Renee Hobbs

Renee Hobbs

Professor, Univ Rhode Island
...loves all things media literacy


Thursday October 6, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay C

4:00pm

Flows of Literacy Across Corporate and User-Produced Digital Worlds

Sociocultural research on young people’s literate practices with digital media have generally focused on literacy events and practices that are grounded in distinct online locations, such as affinity spaces, specific websites, particular video games, or virtual worlds. However, contemporary media landscapes have become networked to such an extent that a transmedial approach is needed to understand the social, cultural, and literate contexts that young people inhabit.

In this presentation we use qualitative content analyses of products and artifacts from the Hunger Games media franchise to explore literacy practices as embedded in corporate and fan-produced transmedia ecologies. Data for this study include Hunger Games-related texts (books, fan fiction stories, websites, fan videos), products (video games), and artifacts (curricular materials) produced by the publishing company Scholastic, the marketing company Lionsgate, and by fans of the franchise. Qualitative content analysis is used to compare and contrast patterns in relation to the following questions:

● What types of entry-points for literate participation are sponsored by the official producers of these transmedia products?

● What types of entry-points for literate participation are created by consumers or prosumers of these transmedia products?

● How might these entry-points shape and constrain young people’s literate participation?  

Such questions encourage us to look beyond spatial and structural boundaries to understand how flows of corporate and user-produced artifacts can shape, constrain, and expand young people’s literate repertoires.




Thursday October 6, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay D

4:30pm

Break
Time to get to the Ignite Talks!

Thursday October 6, 2016 4:30pm - 4:45pm
TBA

4:45pm

Ignite Talk Presentations

Official Ignite Talks! 
Ignite Talks will be hosted by Gardner Campbell and will take place Thursday, October 6, 2016 and Friday, October 7, 2016.

Thursday, October 6, 2016
Kim Jaxon, California State University, Chico
Ana Maria Campos, SPARX NYC Parks
Bridget McGraw, Pilot City
Erhardt Graeff, MIT Center for Civic Media
Jason Engerman, Penn State University
Christian Friedrich, Hamburg University of Technology/Leuphana Digital School
Peter McPartlan, University of California, Irvine
Robin DeRosa, Plymouth State University
Mark Deppe, University of California, Irvine
Annie Mais, Road Trip Nation 

 


Thursday October 6, 2016 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Doheny Ballroom

6:00pm

DML2016 Reception
Come and celebrate the seventh DML conference! We will feature a Tech Showcase, a group of ed innovators that are bringing you the latest.

 

Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

3D Printing Social Learning Analytics: Engagement Trees Grow in SuiteC

The turn in learning sciences towards more sociocultural-oriented theories of development has no doubt spurred an interest in creating virtual learning environments that privilege peer-to-peer collaboration, discourse, and content sharing over more didactic, instructor-centered pedagogies. Join me in exploring software demos, course examples, and preliminary findings from the social learning software SuiteC, including a look at our unique 3D printed “Engagement Trees”- data objects representing student social participation in two online undergraduate courses.

SuiteC comprises three interrelated LTI apps that live inside our campus Canvas learning management system, and through custom API integrations, interact with native Canvas tools. The three apps include: 1) Asset Library for sharing, viewing discussing, and liking student-generated content organized by filters and hashtags; 2) Whiteboards for remixing Assets in the Library through individual/collaborative multimodal composing; and 3) Engagement Index for tracking and awarding social points displayed on a course leaderboard and visualizing this social participation in a weekly analytics report. Visit https://www.ets.berkeley.edu/suitec for more info.

Drawing from a social learning analytics toolkit and an assemblage approach, this project reports preliminary findings from SuiteC implementation in two online learning courses, visualizing patterns and trends in social participation in relation to SuiteC features and the pedagogical orientations of the courses.  


Speakers
avatar for John Scott

John Scott

Researcher-Instructor, UC Berkeley


Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Foyer

6:00pm

Common Sense Education: How edtech ratings and reviews connect teachers and students with transformative digital media

Common Sense Education's community helps preK-12 educators discover, use, and share the best apps, games, websites, and digital curricula for their students. Since its launch in 2013, the ratings and reviews site (previously known as Graphite) has provided unbiased, rigorous ratings and practical insights from an active community of teachers. In this talk, reviewer and assistant editor Patricia Monticello Kievlan will discuss her experiences as a member of Common Sense Education's founding writing team and her work scouring edtech for the best tools to support learning experiences for a wide range of student needs. This talk will explore how Common Sense Education reviewers evaluate edtech for engagement, pedagogy, and support, and it will discuss key insights for how teachers and edtech developers can use digital media to design and build a flexible, supportive, and sustainable learning environment for every child.

As a classroom teacher and administrator, Monticello Kievlan has worked to connect students, teachers, and school learning specialists with the best edtech tools to support teaching and learning. As a community builder with The Sprout Fund in Pittsburgh's Remake Learning Network, she investigates ways to use digital media to help formal and informal educators improve their practice and better serve their students. She's critically interested in how edtech breaks down barriers to access, whether it's helping a dyslexic reader access the curriculum or helping families combat the summer slide. This talk explores how Common Sense Education's critical lens offers a helpful focus for understanding what works in digital media for -- and what work still needs to be done.

 

 



Speakers
PM

Patricia Monticello Kievlan

Program Associate, Community Building, The Sprout Fund


Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

Experiencing BioSim: Learning Complex Systems through Play and Technology
This session involves a hands-on demonstration of BeeSim, which helps young children think about complex systems through play and technology. Systems thinking allows us to better understand the many systems that operate in the world around us, however, the majority of learners do not fully understand these ubiquitous systems on a deep level. BeeSim (Peppler, Danish, Zaitlen, Glosson, Jacobs, & Phelps, 2010), is a “game-like” participatory simulation – an embodied experience where participants interact to form the simulation, and are supported by computational technologies (Colella, 2000) -- that provides a first-person look into the complexity of nectar foraging behaviors of a honeybee . 
In BeeSim, students in grades K-3 wear electronically enhanced bee puppets to “become a honeybee” and work together to collect nectar from a field of electronic “flowers.” Attendees will have a chance to experience the technology in person, using bee puppets to collect nectar for their hive. Flowers may have poor or no nectar, and “bees” must use feedback from the system to decide what information to share, just like real honeybees. Technology has enhanced the gameplay in deep and interesting ways, but it is the game rules that provide the foundation for learning. Game elements such as competition between hives and nonverbal communication are the crucial pieces that effectively and robustly guide students toward learning goals.

Speakers
NT

Naomi Thompson

Graduate Research Assistant, Creativity Labs, Indiana University


Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

hypothes.is: Digital and Civic Literacy in the Age of Web Annotation

“Annotate” is a word previously confined to the pedagogy of the humanities classroom, but now there is an “Annotate” button on a rap lyric website that allows young people to comment on and discuss the language and ideas of their favorite pop songs. For the 2016 State of the Union, presidential speech writers past and present officially annotated the text of the speech on the White House website, offering their thoughts about rhetorical strategy and social context in the margins of the address. In the informal educational space we know as the Web, we are entering an Age of Annotation. Classroom educators can leverage this technology not only to help students develop digital literacy skills but to empower them to become thoughtful and responsible digital citizens.

For teachers and students in particular there is nothing new about the age-­old learning practice of annotation. Marginal note-taking has been proven to encourage active reading and critical thinking and writing skills. Online, though, this practice becomes social, collaborative, and multimodal. Reading closely means not only paying careful attention to the words of an author but to the responses of one’s classmates. Critical “writing” might take the form of images or videos added in the margins of a text under study. Even as students work together to create meaning, the work of individual contributors can become more apparent: a student might distinguish themselves as having a keen ear for historical context or an eye for graphic design. Further, web annotation enables students to explore independent lines of inquiry more dynamically, leaving a trail of their thinking as they navigate the Internet.

Jeremy Dean, Director of Education at hypothes.is, an open source, non-profit software group developing web annotation technology for the classroom, will lead off this session by giving a practical and historical introduction to the hypothes.is tool. Three practicing teachers, Mia Zamora, Larry Hanley, and Joel Garza, will then discuss the use of the hypothes.is tool in their respective classrooms, ranging from high school to college to graduate education. Finally, the group will discuss the role of annotation in the National Writing Project’s Letters to the Next President 2.0 initiative, in which hypothes.is is being used by teachers and students across the country to discuss the 2016 election and “write back” to the candidates themselves.

We will thus conclude by broadening the conversation about web annotation as simply a powerful teaching and learning tool to web annotation as a means of online civic engagement. While web annotation can and does activate the 21st century learning skills emphasized in curriculums across the country, as a digital technology that is in use beyond the classroom, it has the potential to empower young people as responsible and engaged thinkers in the real world too. Participants will leave this session with a practical understanding of how to use the hypothes.is tool in their classrooms as well how they might incorporate a practice of web annotation into their own intellectual inquiries and conversations.



Speakers
RK

Remi Kalir

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor, English, Kean University
Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.


Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

Interactive Tales (I-Tales)

“World languages” is one of the key fundamental subjects for 21st Century students (P21, 2015). However, resources—human and materials alike—for children learning non-English languages are often scarce. Existing learning materials are often designed for older audience or adapted from those written for native speakers (with more advanced languages and sometimes culturally irrelevant references). Interactive Tales (I-Tales) aims to address this need and engage young world language learners and their parents, extend their exposure to and practice with their world languages, and thereby improve their world language oral proficiency, reading competence, and vocabulary knowledge. In our presentation, we will introduce the I-Tales project. Informed by research on games and digital media, I-Tales is a tablet app functioning as a combination of games and “choose-your-own adventure” stories. The prototype we will use in presentation is designed for enhancing and helping children’s language development in Mandarin Chinese. We will highlight the design and learning principles behind the app. For example, the learners create their own avatars and progress through stories with different language difficulty levels. As the avatars advance in the stories by choosing their own paths, they also pick up various tokens that may help them unlock additional story contents. Each level will highlight key vocabulary words and sentence structures. The tokens for unlocking new contents and building the avatar character can be acquired by encountering new materials in the stories and in practicing them in mini-games. Future implementation plans of I-Tales will also be discussed.




Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

Ready: the open-ended software creator for you

What happens when making software is fundamentally shifted, away from interpreted computer languages, to a tactile and visual programming medium?  Building on some of the groundbreaking thinking by theorists like Bret Victor in his seminal demo “Stop Drawing Dead Fish,” Ready is the product of two years of deep R&D with students and schools in the USA and Canada, rethinking how software is made from the inside out.

This session presents findings from schools and camps using the Ready system (getready.io), in particular, how motivation to learn coding changes when the emphasis of memorizing syntax as pre-condition for creativity shifts towards an emphasis to understanding systems theory and logical constructs.  What does software as a form of “self-expression” look like?  How can software, rooted in the grammar of games, be constructed to tell stories that reflect the unique perspective and experience of the child?  How can educators, who often lack direct computer science education, be empowered to confidently teach the architecture of software?  How are students from dramatically different socioeconomic backgrounds expressing themselves in this medium?  

Findings from the Ready pilot programs in privileged independent schools and camps, low-income public schools, and charter schools focused on neurologically challenged students, provide a fascinating view of the “democratization of software creation,” with deep implications for making “code to learn, learn to code” relevant across diverse communities and experiences.  Join us for a an exploration of the new frontier of creation.



Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

SEED - A remix tool for modular learning content

The session will focus on the ongoing development of an open source tool and specification, which is being developed at Penn State that enables the production of content for online learning according to principles of remixing. The tool is being designed to enable amateurs and experts alike to produce modular learning content, which is important for Open Educational Resources (OER), an emerging educational area that is still in its early stages.

OER is loosely defined as any resource that enables teaching and learning with minimal usage restrictions. However, OER production has yet to become popular with the majority of faculty in higher education for reasons including lack of awareness, technical inhibitions, policy confusion, IP concerns, time constraints, and a lack of incentives.

The purpose of our presentation is to create awareness and infuse interest in the possibilities of transformative OER authoring tools. To achieve this, we will demonstrate how anyone using remix principles can now search, fork, combine, alter, publish, and share OER specified materials to produce an online course with relative ease. By displaying the tool’s powerful recombinant capability, we also aim to show how a standard OER specification can impact the growth and availability of educational materials. Our presentation will include, both, the practical aspects of the tool as well as its cultural and theoretical importance for open education.

 



Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

SpeechBlocks: Using Literacy Apps as Building Blocks to Analyze Play

Our goal at the Laboratory for Social Machines is to create technology that empowers learners by providing self-expressive, socially collaborative, and playful literacy learning opportunities. We have developed an early literacy learning app called SpeechBlocks, where children can manipulate letter blocks to hear the sounds their words and letters make when they are constructed and deconstructed. Through this app, children are exposed to emergent literacy practices that teach alphabetic principles in personally meaningful ways. We piloted SpeechBlocks with 16 preschool students and found that it is an effective literacy learning tool that inspires creativity and supports organic social interactions. During the pilot, we instrumented the mobile devices and classroom environment to collect a corpus of rich qualitative and quantitative data. We are using the results from this pilot to explore how we can go beyond learning analytics in early education by introducing what we are calling play analytics, data-driven analysis of free play. We are examining the potential for open-ended, child-driven technology, like SpeechBlocks, to serve as an unstructured playground to collect and combine contextual and behavioral data. The analysis of this data, through play analytics, may have implications for researchers, educators, and parents by providing a more descriptive view of children’s learning processes and literacy skills. Such analysis may also help us build automatic scaffolding tools into our apps to provide personalized learning activities that are child-driven, machine-guided.



Speakers

Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

The Amino One Personal BioLab: Experience Bioengineering hands-on... from concept to product

Biotechnology is the transformative technology of the 21st century. Bioengineered Food, Fragrances, Medicine, Energy, and Materials industries are used by billions of people across the world every year.  Learning genetic engineering and biotechnology hands-on will make you and your students the leading innovators of the 21st century!

Specifically conceived for new learners, The Amino One Personal BioLab is part of a complete ecosystem of hardware, software and wetware. By introducing application-based DNA kits like the Artist App to create Pigments for paint and dyes, and the Glow App, a ready-to-engineer living nightlight, the Amino One kit allows individuals of all levels and ages to experience bioengineering hands on from concept to useable product... in a few days.  In the future, anyone will be able to engineer their own flavor of bread, of beer, of yogurt, make smells and pigments, materials, cosmetics, even medicine. This workshop-style talk will allow you to become familiar with this new teaching/learning system for science, and even try your hands at bioengineering too!




Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

6:00pm

Virtual Reality and Virtual Exchange: Tools and Techniques for Global Education

Virtual reality (VR) is one of the most exciting emerging technologies today, especially for the education sector. The opportunity to immerse students in different environments and provide novel experiences has tremendous potential for developing empathy, sharpening critical 21st-century skills, and sparking a desire to engage with the world. And yet, just like any other cutting-edge tool, VR’s ability to actually enhance learning hinges on high quality content and implementation. How, then, can we harness the power of this innovative technology for educational purposes and advancing social good?

Global Nomads Group (GNG), a nonprofit with proven experience in virtual exchange (technology-enabled, sustained, people-to-people educational programs) and a leader in developing VR’s applications for the global education field, will lead an interactive, results-driven workshop to address this question. Participants will have the opportunity to explore GNG’s innovative program model, experience VR technology, and brainstorm ways in which they can integrate these principles and practices into their own contexts.

During this workshop, participants will:

- Learn about GNG’s innovative virtual exchange programs, including the accompanying curriculum, facilitation and classroom implementation techniques, and monitoring and evaluation practices

- Explore how VR can be used for educational purposes, especially to develop socio-emotional learning, global awareness, and the 21st-century skills necessary to succeed in today’s global economy

- Experience VR technology

- Review concrete examples of GNG programs and hear testimonies from students and educators  who participated in virtual exchange programs at View Park High School (located in South Los Angeles)

- Brainstorm how to integrate virtual exchange and VR into participants’ current or aspirational activities, programs, and/or classrooms

At the end of this workshop, participants will understand how innovative technology, when combined with quality content and implementation, can have powerful effects on students’ learning and capacity to bring positive change to their communities. They will also have the tools and techniques to apply the power of virtual exchange and VR for their own educational and programmatic goals.



Speakers
GL

Grace Lau

Director of Virtual Reality, Global Nomads Group


Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Foyer

6:00pm

WoW! It's Immersive: Designing Language Learning Experiences in World of Warcraft

When we seek opportunities to leverage existing digital spaces and communities, we open up the possibility for constructing new curricular structures. Project V-LIFe (Virtual Language Immersion in Foreign LanguagEs) is part of the Multidisciplinary Design Program at the University of California, Irvine. This interdisciplinary project utilizes the immersive language environment afforded by foreign-language servers of the massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG), World of Warcraft (WoW). Leveraging this immersive setting, custom in-game tasks enable second language (L2) learners to negotiate meaning in real time by engaging with the L2 and making themselves understood in culturally appropriate ways. This pedagogical strategy provides access to areas of communication and cultural competency not feasible in traditional classrooms. During the initial 1-week pilot of our ongoing project, students participated in researcher-designed quests intended to facilitate  communication (reading, writing, listening, speaking). Additionally, in scaffolded debriefing sessions students were given the opportunity to explore the confines inherent in their own cultural frames as well as notions of the ‘real’ German-speaking world. In this presentation we will share challenges and benefits we encountered in designing “learning quests” for use within a platform developed without L2 outcomes in mind. Successful strategies are highlighted which leverage the native game design and storyline to embolden L2 use with native speakers on an individual, collaborative, learner-learner and learner-native speaker basis.



Speakers
avatar for Kierstin H Brehm

Kierstin H Brehm

German Studies, Graduate Student, UC Irvine


Thursday October 6, 2016 6:00pm - 7:30pm
TBA

7:30pm

Shuttle Pick Up: UCI to Hotel Irvine/Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the side of Aldrich Hall (by the flag poles). The shuttle will depart promptly at 7:30 PM and will stop at the Hotel Irvine and Fairmont Newport Beach. 

Thursday October 6, 2016 7:30pm - 8:00pm
Aldrich Hall (By Flagpoles)

8:30pm

Shuttle Pick Up: UCI to Hotel Irvine/Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the side of Aldrich Hall (by the flag poles). The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:30 PM and will stop at the Hotel Irvine and Fairmont Newport Beach. 

Thursday October 6, 2016 8:30pm - 9:00pm
Aldrich Hall (By Flagpoles)
 
Friday, October 7
 

8:00am

Shuttle Pick Up: Hotel Irvine (Direct to UCI)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:00 AM and travel directly to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center. 

Friday October 7, 2016 8:00am - 8:15am
Hotel Irvine

8:00am

Charging Station
Need a place to charge your laptop or a quiet place to work? Check out the Crescent Bay AB room.

Friday October 7, 2016 8:00am - 5:00pm
Crescent Bay AB

8:20am

Shuttle Pick Up: Fairmont (Direct to UCI)
The Fairmont is providing a courtesy shuttle to UCI. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:20 AM and travel directly to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center. 

Friday October 7, 2016 8:20am - 8:35am
Fairmont Newport Beach

8:40am

Shuttle Pick Up: Hotel Irvine to Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:40 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach outside the entrance area around 8:55 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center.  

Friday October 7, 2016 8:40am - 8:55am
Hotel Irvine

8:55am

Shuttle Pick Up: Fairmont to UCI (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the Hotel Irvine, outside the valet area. The shuttle will depart promptly at 8:40 AM and will stop at The Fairmont Newport Beach outside the entrance area around 8:55 AM. The shuttle will then travel to UC Irvine. The drop off location is Aldrich Hall. Signage will direct you to the student center.  

Friday October 7, 2016 8:55am - 9:10am
Fairmont Newport Beach

9:00am

Designing with Community Partners to Facilitate Meaningful Learning Experiences for Underrepresented and Marginalized Youth

The Digital Youth Network (DYN) at DePaul University is a non-profit organization dedicated to creating learning environments that support all youth in developing the skills needed to actively participate in a democratic and globally networked society.  Critical to our design process is our collaborations with community organizations. In this panel we present five projects that differ in scale and the mode of the learning experience (online, blended, face-to-face).  We share our co-design process, and the opportunities and challenges faced creating meaningful experiences for diverse youth, while balancing the needs and constraints of participating organizations.

1) Transforming Chicago into a Citywide Campus for Interest-Based Learning

The Chicago City of Learning (CCOL) initiative is a partnership with the city of Chicago, DYN, and over 130 youth-serving organizations to provide low-cost, informal STEAM learning opportunities to all youth.  To transform Chicago into a campus of learning, we provide trainings, visualizations, and frameworks to build and make visible to all the living learning ecosystem of Chicago.   We discuss our approach and the challenges we faced supporting this citywide innovation.

2) The Young Author Playlist: Collaborating Across Spaces to Support Writing

The Young Author Playlist is a learning pathway designed to support youth's interest in writing.  The playlist was co-developed by writing mentors in Chicago's informal education space using a design process based on the DYN Learning Pathway Framework. This presentation describes the role of partnerships across informal and formal learning spaces in both creating and implementing an equity-based approach to supporting youth engagement in writing.

3) Digital Exchange Society: Connecting Youth in Chicago and Morocco Virtually

Under the J. Christopher Stevens Initiative, DYN has partnered with school and community organizations to engage youth from Chicago and Morocco in cross-cultural exchanges through the co-creation of digital artifacts. Key to taking this impact to scale is the collaboration across countries and sectors. Participants in this presentation will learn how we facilitated compelling learning experiences for youth and how virtual exchange utilized new media technologies to link young people across cultures in sustained and meaningful ways.

4) “We’re doing some cool stuff on there”: Designing a Collaborative Blended Learning Culture in the Classroom

We share a case study based on a collaboration with a school to develop an online social learning network to support interest-based and academic learning. This presentation will cover the successes and challenges of designing, implementing, and maintaining an active blended learning community through collaboration with teachers, students, researchers, designers, teaching artists, and administrators.

5) Minecraft Citywide Server - Creating an Gaming Ecosystem to Support Youth Exploration of Computer Science.

DYN is leveraging the popularity and extensibility of Minecraft, an online, multiplayer game, to expose and connect underrepresented youth to long-term computing pathways. Working closely with community partners, we are designing computing-related worlds and automatic digital badges to help youth translate their computing experience in Minecraft to other learning spaces. We also use badges to connect youth to relevant informal programs in Chicago. We discuss our design and collaboration process to implementing this initiative. We also discuss how we overcame challenges related to unequal technology infrastructures.


Speakers
JS

Jim Sandherr

Research Associate, Digital Youth Network


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Woods BC

9:00am

Art is What your Digital Teaching Needs!
In this 90-minute, hands-on workshop session, attendees will learn about the growing number of free, online opportunities for expanding knowledge and experience in the arts and for supporting their teaching practice to include music and visual art digital resources. An important focus of the workshop will be understanding why and how collaborating with museums and art schools is an effective way to develop compelling digital media content. Case studies of successful online course development with the arts will inspire teams of attendees to rapidly prototype new course designs during the workshop. Attendees will be encouraged to integrate art subject matter as well as art studio teaching practices, such as group critique and improvisation, into their designs. Attendees will also learn about where and how to find high quality visual and audio media elements that are online and free for educational use.

The workshop will be lead by two veteran digital educators who well represent the visual art and music worlds: Deborah Howes and Jordan Natan Hochenbaum. Deborah has been engaged in distance learning since 2007 when she trained docents in Anchorage, Alaska via Internet-2 from the Metropolitan Museum of Art where she served as Museum Educator in Charge of Educational Media for 13 years. She helped build and still teaches in the online M.A. graduate program in Museum Studies at Johns Hopkins University, specializing in museum education. Most recently Deborah served as the Director of Digital Learning at The Museum of Modern Art where she produced and managed a variety of online educational programs, including MOOCs with platform partner Coursera, attracting over 50,000 participants from more than 100 countries. Deborah earned a B.A. with Honors in Art History from Wellesley College and an M.A. in Education from the University of Chicago.


Jordan Natan Hochenbaum is a co-founder, Chief Creative Officer, and Vice President of Engineering at Kadenze, the art MOOC platform. He also serves as faculty in the Music Technology and Digital Media programs at California Institute of the Arts, where he teaches creative coding, engineering, computational & generative graphics, music production and performance. His work involves leveraging machine learning in the arts, designing novel interfaces for musical performance, and playing and composing in a wide range of musical genres. As co-founder of FlipMu, Jordan has explored large-scale interactive environments (such as the recent 4-story multitouch performance space for RedBull and Vita Motus), real-time data sonification, generative audio-visual systems, and musical interface design with open source aesthetics. Co-founding the Noise Index, he has exhibited installations and public artworks that question our relationships with technology, in New York, London, Paris, and Los Angeles.

Combining their considerable and complementary backgrounds in designing learning experiences for and with the arts, Jordan and Deborah will deliver a workshop that is participatory, inclusive and informed by best practices at all levels All interested in online learning are welcome, regardless of previous experience.



Speakers
JH

Jordan Hochenbaum

CCO / VP Engineering, Kadenze, Inc.


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Pacific Ballroom B

9:00am

Creating Teen Community Spaces at Museums
Motivated to foster new levels of access to museums for Chicagoland youth, the Teen Learning Lab at Shedd Aquarium, Adler Teen Hangouts at Adler Planetarium and Open Studio at The Field Museum are designed to connect teens with projects, exhibits and mentors through drop-in programming, workshops and interest-driven project support. These digitally-focused, out-of-school spaces devoted to teens are free, drop-in and built around the Connected Learning principles.

Session participants will learn about the launch of these new teen spaces including unique successes and challenges from each presenting organization. Participants will also explore hands-on activities typical of these drop-in spaces.

The Teen Learning Lab at Shedd Aquarium
Shedd Aquarium's Teen Learning Lab is a free space where teens can explore their curiosities about science, animals and the natural world by collaborating on existing programs or designing their own projects. Developed by teens for teens, the lab is a hub for students to hang out, play around and geek out with other science-minded peers while also utilizing a wide range of technology. Since its launch in fall 2013, the Teen Learning Lab has welcomed more than 1400 Chicagoland high school students, many of whom are frequent visitors to the interest-driven space.

Adler Teen Hangouts at Adler Planetarium
After almost five years of developing informal learning programs for high schoolers, the Adler Planetarium started hosting weekly Teen Hangouts in Fall 2014. At Adler Teen Hangouts, Chicago teens can explore STE(A)M skills, do homework and meet new friends. Staff curated programming includes making music using space sounds and creating stop-motion animations of alien sculptures. Hangouts are a natural mentoring space where students seek out Adler staff for help on projects and information about scholarships and college. In our first year (2014-15) of Hangouts, an average of 12 students attended weekly, with 57 unique students attending for the year. In our second year, the weekly average is 14 students, with a marked increase in students who have gone on to participate in other Adler teen programs.

Open Studio at The Field Museum
The Field Museum launched its Open Studio in Fall 2015 to invite teens to explore the natural and cultural world at their own pace. Programs explore the breadth of science and social sciences researched at The Field and quickly engage teens in exploratory play and making activities. Open Studio programs are causal programs which introduce teens to the museum and provide on-ramps to other more intensive teen programs. In Open Studio, activities center around a theme including exploration of the physical space in and around the Museum where youth are invited to use the technology in the Studio to interpret the museum and make meaningful digital artifacts. Examples of past programs include using Arduinos to monitor the Museum's community garden and designing shadow puppets as inspired by the Museum's China Hall exhibit. The Studio space was originally conceived of as a digital classroom, and is currently being redesigned by the Museum's Youth Council for a more teen-friendly look and feel.


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay C

9:00am

Critical Music Making: Rethinking Audio Production as Maker Culture
Audio production encompasses podcasting, soundtrack creation, music making, voiceover work, and much more. The tools to produce audio are pervasive, and documentation is omnipresent, but barriers to entry, whether technological or psychological, keep many users from ever trying it. By applying the tenets of Critical Making to audio production and positioning it as part of making culture, it becomes a pathway for users to gain confidence to not only make sound projects but also become familiar with other technologies that can exist across previously diverse domains. It also helps users learn how to harness this powerful communication form for better research, more interesting projects, and personal creative output.
Audio production tools are ubiquitous. They live on our smartphones and tablets, in our pockets and bags, as free apps using built-in microphones. They arrive pre-installed with our new computers. Libraries have made audio production tools available to users for decades, and the lower cost of professional hardware and software makes a robust studio setup approachable for almost every level of institution. However, few of us ever do more than capture content, and rarely - if ever - spend time editing and organizing that content. Our simple smartphone apps, the sometimes-overwhelming interfaces of Digital Audio Workstations, and unfamiliar hardware present barriers for novices interested in audio production. Even more problematic is user self confidence regarding their perceived need for musical talent to begin using any of these tools in the first place. Finding methods to ease the technology woes and to increase the confidence of learners can improve the use of audio as a learning medium.
Makerspaces over the past several years have effectively helped people connect to the technological world through critical making, a theory which emphasizes learning by doing, and of seeking inspiration through the act of making rather than the success of the final product. The goal of critical making is to imbue patrons with the confidence to embrace the making process, which becomes practice, and, with persistence, invariably leads to mastery in a chosen domain.
In this session librarians from North Carolina State University will show how they have used music, and specifically audio production techniques, to promote the critical making ideology. They will demonstrate how to use traditional Makerspace tools like Arduino and MaKey MaKey to bridge the gap between maker culture and audio production, discuss workshops that connect patrons to podcasting, beatmaking in hip hop culture, and soundtracks through making, and explore the idea of fair use in audio production and why learning this skill can inform copyright literacy. There will also be a hands-on audio production workshop, using ubiquitous and professional tools to produce a multitrack audio work and demonstrate how critical making in this domain is an inspirational activity that leads to increased digital media literacy, a better understanding of audio production techniques, and creates a pathway to other forms of making.

Speakers
avatar for David Woodbury

David Woodbury

Associate Head, User Experience, NCSU Libraries
David Woodbury is a librarian in the Learning Spaces and Services department at NCSU Libraries. He manages technology-rich learning spaces at NCSU Libraries including makerspaces, digital media labs, virtual reality exploration spaces, and collaborative computing areas. He leads several key initiatives including an expansive student-focused workshop series and the NCSU Libraries’ technology lending program. He was a member of the Learning Space... Read More →


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay A

9:00am

Re-Crafting Mathematics Education: Exploring Textile Crafts as Tangible Mathematical Manipulatives
Craft communities can be powerful sites for production-centered, interest-driven, peer-supported learning, principles espoused by connected learning (Ito et al., 2013). Communities around textile crafts in particular, such as knitting circles or quilting bees, tend to be dominated by women, due to the long gendered histories of fiber-art production. These crafting practices are inherently mathematical, offering proof of the mathematical activities women choose to participate in across their lifespan. The Re-Crafting Mathematics project focuses on this unusual starting point to address the “STEM pipeline,” by investigating our own engagement in crafts, as well as the culture of crafting that attracts and maintains women’s participation. Understanding these practices can lead to crucial advancements in mathematics education, and elucidate an uncommon topic in the connected learning literature: interest-driven uses of mathematics.

Despite the lack of gender differences in girls’ and boys’ mathematics achievement (Hyde, Lindberg, Linn, Ellis & Williams, 2008), women continue to be underrepresented in STEM careers, comprising only 26 percent of the STEM workforce (US Census, 2011). Studies of females’ mathematical participation suggest that these discrepancies stem not from differences in ability between the genders, but rather from perceptions of mathematics and the extent to which women feel welcome in mathematics-intensive cultures (Alper, 1993; Boaler & Greeno, 2000; Boaler, 2002). School mathematics is frequently stripped of meaningful context; hands-on production restores this context, allowing students to embody mathematical ideas and develop a personal relationship with them.

Many tangible manipulatives, typically found in lower-level mathematics classrooms, consist of blocks and other objects that children build with to explore shape, volume, or quantity, including cuisenaire rods, tangrams, and unifix cubes. Notably, youth perceive these materials and practices (i.e., building) as masculine and, at best, gender-neutral (Peppler, Wohlwend, & Thompson, in preparation), leaving a gap in manipulatives rooted in feminine practices and materials. Moreover, these materials support early understanding of mathematics and are less able to support engagement in more advanced mathematics. In studying traditionally feminine textile crafts, we seek to address this twofold gap in tangible manipulatives by designing new manipulatives (1) with feminine-coded materials rooted in traditional women’s practices, and (2) with high utility in advanced mathematics.

The session will begin with an overview of ethnographies from the Recrafting project that focused on the key practices, materials, and activities in craft communities that connected to mathematical activity. We will then divide into four interactive crafting groups that will explore: 1) ideas of ratio and proportional reasoning through knitting; 2) the complex work of 2D-3D transformations through sewing; 3) symmetry and patterns through weaving; and 4) the geometry and invention of “shortcuts” that occur in the folding and layering of fabric manipulation. These groups will then reconvene and discuss connections between mathematical problem solving and design-based thinking that emerged through the creation of small projects. The session will highlight ways to engage students and educators in mathematical thinking through hands-on crafts, in order to eventually provide youth with new textile-based tangible manipulatives as “objects-to-think-with” in mathematics education.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Chapman

Kate Chapman

PhD Student | Research Assistent, Vanderbilt University
avatar for Anna Keune

Anna Keune

Graduate Research Assistant, Indiana University
Hello! I am a graduate student at the student in the Learning Sciences program at Indiana University. Through my work at the Creativity Labs, I have had the fantastic opportunity to be part of the Maker Ed Open Portfolio project. Through my work on the project, I learned a lot about the amazing things happening at Makerspaces across the US. I am excited to learn more and to share what I have learned about portfolios for making!
avatar for Kate Samson

Kate Samson

Researcher, Indiana University
NT

Naomi Thompson

Graduate Research Assistant, Creativity Labs, Indiana University
avatar for Fai Wisittanawat

Fai Wisittanawat

Graduate student, Vanderbilt University
Hello! I am a doctoral student in the Department of Teaching and Learning at Vanderbilt University. I am interested in understanding disciplinary practices of mathematics and science and designing classroom environments that support students’ participation in those practices in ways that are meaningful to them.


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Pacific Ballroom A

9:00am

From Discovery to Imagined Possible Futures: Exploring Youth Interests

In this discussion, we explore youth interest discovery and their opportunities for imagining possible futures. We look across multiple scales, ranging from three youths’ experiences playing Starcraft to over 3,000 afterschool programs for youth in one large city to explore questions of what ignites youth interests and what conditions surround their pursuit of possible futures and desired outcomes. Through sharing this Connected Learning research, we hope to spark a conversation about ways to support youth in such interest-related pursuits.This panel includes the following presentations, discussant remarks, and a conversation:

Mapping and Modeling the Abundance, Diversity, and Accessibility of Summer Learning Opportunities at the Scale of a City. We explore the abundance, diversity, and accessibility of out of school learning opportunities by taking advantage of a unique dataset for the City of Chicago that includes information on the 3,844 organized summer learning opportunities for youth in the city. Using a combination of data mining techniques and Geographical Information Systems tools, we map the ecology of learning opportunities in a large city, showing the variability in program abundance, diversity, and accessibility across the city.

Supporting interest discovery in a free-choice making and tinkering environment: Not what you might expect! FUSE aims to provide a fun and relaxed way to explore STEAM topics in both school and out-of-school spaces, by providing an environment in which students can pursue diverse ‘challenges’ in areas such as robotics, electronics, graphic design, or 3D printing. Evaluation of FUSE reveals that interest development is characterized not only by sustained engagement into a particular activity, but from the space and opportunity to explore and try out various activities.

“We are all scientists here”: How museum program design supports youth’s science-linked identities. Learning environments play a critical role in shaping youth’s views of science, their interest-development, and their pursuit of science careers. Drawing on youth interviews and museum artifacts, we examine three separate science museum internship programs to understand the relationships among program design, youth’s conceptions and pursuit of science, and their identities within these fields.

Disruptions and Redistribution of Practices: Examining Suspensions of Youths’ Interest-related Activities. Although understanding what sustains engagement in interest-related activities is integral to the field, understanding what disrupts engagement has been largely ignored. We seek to expand and complicate the notion of “conditions of practice” for the youth and their interest-related pursuits. We found that some youth suspended their participation due to loss of access to resources, and other youth suspended pursuits due to competing educational commitments and future desires.

The “Armchair Philosopher”: Learning in StarCraft and Supporting Possible Selves. Research on videogames and learning has typically focused on features of games, and how these can be leveraged to promote deeper learning. We examine how playing StarCraft, and learning within the StarCraft gaming community, influenced three players’ development of “possible selves” as they consider post-secondary aspirations. Our findings indicate that the players envisioned linkages between the game’s skills, strategies, epistemology, and the work they hoped to find—or avoid—in the future.


Moderators
Speakers
DD

Daniela DiGiacomo

Univeristy of Colorado
MH

Michael Harris

Univeristy of Colorado
WP

William Penuel

Professor, University of Colorado Boulder
EV

Erica Van Steenis

University of Colorado
RS

Reed Stevens

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Doheny Ballroom

9:00am

Increasing Equitable Access to Digital Learning in Informal Contexts: Connecting Micro, Meso and Macro Level Factors

This panel presents research and practice around the persistent challenge of achieving equitable youth access to digital learning opportunities in informal contexts. Researchers report stubborn disparities that run along all-too-familiar socioeconomic lines, with youth from wealthier communities enjoying more opportunities to learn important skills and dispositions related to digital media production and design (Hargittai & Walejko, 2008; Margolis, 2008). In an effort to help address this complex problem, we offer a holistic frame that organizes underlying factors impacting equitable access and uptake along three, interconnected levels:

(1) Micro or individual, e.g., factors pertaining to youth and educators and the interactions between them, including youth interest level and developing identities, youth help-seeking orientation and adult orientation toward brokering.
(2) Meso or organizational, e.g, factors related to the development of program models and institutional structures that promote youth access to programs and create viable links to other experiences.
(3) Macro or ecosystem, e.g., factors that may include the availability of programs in a given neighborhood, issues of safety as impinging on access, and discoverability of information about opportunities.

To further illustrate this frame, we have organized a diverse panel of researchers and educators who will speak to each of these levels.

First, Dixie Ching from Hive Research Lab / New York University will present case studies at the micro level, describing youth and Hive educator experiences involving brokering, efforts to make opportunities more accessible, interpersonal challenges that young people face and factors that attenuate that. In addition, she will bring needed attention to how attitudes and realities of informal educators impacts their brokering practices.

Next, Rafi Santo from Hive Research Lab / Indiana University will outline and present data from case studies of organizations within Hive NYC that relate to meso-level issues, offering a vision into the kinds of organizational practices, programs and structures that might be put in place to promote access to learning opportunities.

Following that, Eda Levenson from the Urban Arts Partnership will describe their Alumni Scholars Program (ASP), which seeks to close the opportunity gap by providing long-term support to UAP alumni that connects their programmatic experiences to college and or career goals. In addition to creative and artistic cultivation, ASP focuses on promoting academic persistence and life skills.

Finally, Caitlin Martin from the Digital Youth Network will present how we can utilize technology to address macro level issues such as identifying ‘learning deserts’ through city-wide mapping efforts, and designing programs and platforms that explicitly aim to address geographic gaps by connecting learners and families to digital and local resources and opportunities.

References:
Hargittai, E., & Walejko, G. (2008). The participation divide: content creation and sharing in the digital age. Information, Community and Society, 11(2), 239–256.
Margolis, J. (2008). Stuck in the shallow end: Education, race, and computing. The MIT Press.


Speakers
avatar for Eda Levenson

Eda Levenson

Alumni Scholars Program Manager, Urban Arts Partnership
Eda Levenson has extensive experience leading youth development work spanning across the education, public health, arts-education, and mental health sectors. Eda Levenson received a Masters in Education in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2012. Eda is currently the Program Manager of Alumni Scholars Program at Urban Arts Partnership. | | Talk to Eda about connecting young people to creative... Read More →
avatar for Rafi Santo

Rafi Santo

Hive Research Lab/Indiana University


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay B

9:00am

Talking Politics Online: Youth engagement with civic and political dialogue in the digital age
Civic and political dialogue increasingly occurs online in the digital age. In 2012, fifty-four percent of those who used the Internet engaged in dialogue related to politics online (Smith, 2013). These new opportunities for civic participation are particularly salient for youth. Yet, online contexts also pose unique challenges. Kushin and Kitchener (2009) found that 30% of discussions in Facebook political groups contained personal insults and offensive language. Therefore, supporting youth to engage in productive online civic and political dialogue is increasingly critical. And, yet, there is a lack of research focused on how youth are seizing these opportunities and the ways educators can support them.

In this session, we will explore both research and practice that highlights the ways youth and educators are utilizing the affordances of social and digital media toward productive civic and political dialogue. The session will begin by asking participants to reflect on and discuss an example of an online exchange about a contentious political issue in order to frame the current landscape. Following this, we will share findings from two research studies. The first study by the Good Participation Project explores the strategies of online civic dialoguers - youth who regularly engage online peers in conversations about public issues. The study reveals the strategic moves and tactics youth use to talk politics online, the anxieties and feelings of uncertainty they struggle with, and the supports they turn to - or wish they had - for their online activism.

The second research study by the Civic Engagement Research Group draws on the tactics of high school teachers engaging their students in online dialogue. Analysis revealed that teachers promoted five key stages of opportunity that have the potential to provide youth with foundational skills, build young people's capacity for civic voice, and build bridges toward efficacious civic and political participation in the digital age.

As a means of connecting research to practice, participants will then talk with a partner about the implications of the research studies for the field and their work specifically.

Next, a high school English teacher from Oakland, CA will share her experiences engaging students in researching and blogging about critical issues in their community. By connecting with an authentic audience and going public with their perspectives, students were motivated to expand their research, strengthen their arguments, and engage with one another across differing points of view.

After that the Civic Engagement Coordinator for the Oakland Unified School District will share emerging themes of practice from a year-long professional learning community (PLC) of teachers that engaged students in online dialogue. Teachers from across the District met to reflect on the integration of blogging, the impact on student learning, and ways their classes could be an audience for one another. The successes and challenges of this PLC highlight the different levels of support that enable teachers to do this work effectively in school settings.

Finally, the session will end with an interactive activity where participants post their thoughts about the concepts shared and discuss concluding comments.

Speakers
avatar for Erica Hodgin

Erica Hodgin

Associate Director, Civic Engagement Research Group
Erica Hodgin is the Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Research Group (CERG) at Mills College and the Research Director of the Educating for Participatory Politics project -- an action group of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP). She is also Co-Principal Investigator with Joe Kahne of Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age – a district-wide civic education effort in partnership with... Read More →


Friday October 7, 2016 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay E

10:30am

Break
Coffee provided in foyer area.

Friday October 7, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Foyer

11:00am

Digital Dreamers: Jose Antonio Vargas talks with Henry Jenkins

In conversation with Henry Jenkins, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and undocumented immigrant Jose Antonio Vargas will explore race, immigration, gender, and American identity. This event is free and open to the UCI community. For those unable to attend in  person, the talk will also be live-streamed free of charge. Check this link the day of the event to access the video: http://dml2016.dmlhub.net/ 

About Jose Antonio:

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, filmmaker, and media publisher whose work centers on the changing American identity. He is the founder of Define American, a non-profit media and culture organization that seeks to elevate the conversation around immigration and citizenship in America; and the founder and editor of #EmergingUS, a digital platform that lives at the intersection of race, immigration, and identity in a multicultural America. #EmergingUS is the first-ever media property owned by an undocumented immigrant.

In June 2011, the New York Times Magazine published a groundbreaking essay he wrote in which he revealed and chronicled his life in America as an undocumented immigrant. A year later, he appeared on the cover of TIME magazine worldwide with fellow undocumented immigrants as part of a follow-up cover story he wrote. He then produced and directed Documented, a documentary feature film on his undocumented experience. It world premiered at the AFI Docs film festival in Washington, D.C. in 2013, was released theatrically and broadcast on CNN in 2014, and received a 2015 NAACP Image Award nomination for Outstanding Documentary.Documented is now available on various digital platforms.

In July 2015, MTV aired, as part of its “Look Different” campaign, White Peoplea television special he produced and directed on what it means to be young and white in contemporary America.

He is a very proud graduate of San Francisco State University (‘04), where he was named Alumnus of the Year in 2012, and Mountain View High School (‘00).

He lives in Los Angeles, California.

About Henry Jenkins:

Henry Jenkins is the Provost’s Professor of Communication, Journalism, and Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California. He arrived at USC in Fall 2009 after spending the past decade as the Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program and the Peter de Florez Professor of Humanities. He is the author and/or editor of twelve books on various aspects of media and popular culture, including Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory CultureHop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Cultureand From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games. His newest books include Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide and Fans, Bloggers and Gamers: Exploring Participatory Culture. He is currently co-authoring a book on“spreadable media” with Sam Ford and Joshua Green. He has written for Technology ReviewComputer GamesSalon, and The Huffington Post.

Jenkins is the principal investigator for Project New Media Literacies (NML), a group which originated as part of the MacArthur Digital Media and Learning Initiative. Jenkins wrote a white paper on learning in a participatory culture that has become the springboard for the group’s efforts to develop and test educational materials focused on preparing students for engagement with the new media landscape. He also continues to be actively involved with the Convergence Culture Consortium, a faculty network which seeks to build bridges between academic researchers and the media industry in order to help inform the rethinking of consumer relations in an age of participatory culture. And he is working at USC to develop a new research project focused on young people, participatory culture, and public engagement.

While at MIT, he was one of the principal investigators for The Education Arcade, a consortium of educators and business leaders working to promote the educational use of computer and video games. Jenkins also plays a significant role as a public advocate for fans, gamers and bloggers: testifying before the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee investigation into “Marketing Violence to Youth” following the Columbine shootings; advocating for media literacy education before the Federal Communications Commission; calling for a more consumer-oriented approach to intellectual property at a closed door meeting of the governing body of the World Economic Forum; signing amicus briefs in opposition to games censorship; and regularly speaking to the press and other media about aspects of media change and popular culture. Jenkins has a B.A. in Political Science and Journalism from Georgia State University, a M.A. in Communication Studies from the University of Iowa and a PhD in Communication Arts from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Friday October 7, 2016 11:00am - 12:30pm
Doheny Ballroom

12:30pm

Lunch
On your own! Explore great eats around UC Irvine.

Friday October 7, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Digital Design and Fabrication for Young Learners Inspired by Low-tech Makerspaces
Teen and adult makers have been using professional-grade high-tech fabrication tools, including 3D printers, laser cutters, vinyl cutters, and digital sewing machines, to express themselves and to shape the world around them. Can our youngest learners join in on this fun and innovation? This session will explore how two museum-based Fab Labs, and their partners, are inviting early childhood and elementary-aged children to try digital fabrication technology in order to navigate the design process from concept to production, and turn their big ideas into reality. Presenters from the Bay Area Discovery Museum, the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago, and FableVision will share lessons learned from prototyping, refining, and evaluating digital fabrication programming and software for early childhood learners and beyond. They will discuss why (with the appropriate facilitation, analog and digital materials, and software) Fab Labs are ideal spaces for developing the creativity, decision making, and interpersonal skills necessary for solving complex future problems.

In designing quality educational experiences for young learners, what affordances are provided in a non-tech environment vs. in a tech-assisted environment? Presenters will dissect this question as they share their experiences developing programming, curricula, and software that allow children to explore and experiment, ideate and iterate. These key engineering and design skills and processes can be measurably developed non-digital maker spaces, and the engagement and learning in such spaces provides insight about the intentional addition of technology for young learners.

Rabiah Mayas, Director of Science and Integrated Strategies at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago brings experience directing and evaluating both the high-tech Wanger Family Fab Lab, which provides advanced fabrication programming to youth, and the Black Creativity Innovation Studio, an analog maker space for younger visitors to experiment and explore ideas through hands-on prototype making, which has provided inspiration for the Fab Lab.

Elizabeth Rood, VP of Education Strategy, and Tristan Schoening, Fab Lab Assistant Manager, from the Bay Area Discovery Museum bring experience prototyping programming in the world's first Early Childhood Fab Lab, a space for children aged 3 to 10 to explore digital fabrication and construction with a variety of materials.

Paul Reynolds, CEO of FableVision, brings experience developing Fab@School Maker Studio, a web-based digital fabrication software that allows students to create machines, 3D models, and pop-ups with tools ranging from scissors to inexpensive 2D cutters and 3D printers; FableVision is collaborating with the Bay Area Discovery Museum to age down this software to be used with early elementary students and teachers.

Offering opportunities for digital fabrication to diverse populations in terms of age, race, and socio-economic status is critical. Technological proficiency is the next opportunity gap, and early exposure to and familiarity with digital tools can help underserved young people bridge this gap. By starting early in life, with the support and participation of their caregivers, these interests, skills, and abilities will follow students through their academic careers and beyond. Presenters will ask the audience how they might bring analog design and digital fabrication to a new audience in their school, program, or community.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Reynolds

Paul Reynolds

CEO, FableVision
Paul is the CEO and Co-Founder of Boston-based FableVision, which creates and distributes original educational media, mobile games and apps designed to move the world to a better place. Paul has helped build the multimillion-dollar firm into an internationally recognized multimedia developer and publisher, with partnerships, strategic alliances and clients across many industries - broadcast, museum, institutional, K12, educational publishing... Read More →
TS

Tristan Schcoening

Fab Lab Specialist, Bay Area Discovery Museum


Friday October 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pacific Ballroom B

2:00pm

The DigitalLearningification of Informal Learning Centers: Lessons from three museums
Museums are unique and influential informal learning institutions that can be powerful spaces for young people to learn, connect and create digital media. Museums often have more freedom and resources than a school, library or afterschool program to support a variety of digital learning offerings for youth, such as tinkering spaces, youth-led media creation, and exhibit creation. At the same time, museums are moving beyond siloed programs for young people, toward connected learning experiences that better integrate with school-time learning, other institutions that youth are involved in, and their time alone and with their peers.

Come learn what the leaders of digital learning at three respected natural history museums -- the American Museum of Natural History, the Field Museum, and the California Academy of Sciences -- are doing to to bring together digital learning, connected learning, and STEM education. In particular, the session will focus on what the youth experience is like in our programs, how we spread innovation from our programs more widely within our institution and beyond, and how we work with our local partners and networks to increase our impact.

An interactive breakout session will follow to allow participants to do a deeper dive into some of the key issues in developing impactful digital learning programs at an informal educational setting. Tips, tools, and links will be shared with participants at the end of the session, for further exploration and consideration.

Speakers
avatar for Rik Panganiban

Rik Panganiban

Senior Instructional Design Lead, California Academy of Sciences
Digital learning, youth development, instructional design, online learning, blended learning, afterschool, STEM learning


Friday October 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pacific Ballroom A

2:00pm

Activism and Civics

Abstracts are available here: http://dml2016.dmlhub.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Activism-and-Civics-.pdf, and are attached as a resource file below. 

Individual Session Research
225 Our Voices Matter: Black Activist Media Makers in Austin, Texas
Krishnan Vasudevan | University of Texas at Austin | @kvasudevanIndividual Session Compelling Models

Individual Session Compelling Models
255 Building a Resource Together to Support Teaching and Learning about Race, Racism, and Participatory Activism
Diana Lee | USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism | @MsDianaLee

Individual Session Research
251 Dialogue and Disagreement in the Era of Facebook and Twitter
Ashley Lee

Individual Session Research
109 Regenerate Chicago Neighborhoods: A case study of youth and participatory politics
Kiley Larson | New York University | @kileylarson
Erin Bradley | New York University | @NYU_ErinB
Richard Arum | New York University

Individual Session Research
230 Musical Pathways: How youth explore civic engagement, critical self-awareness, and learning partnerships through music making
Erica Van Steenis | University of Colorado, Boulder

Individual Session Research
60 Carving Out and Constructing E-Spaces of Civic Praxis
Jill Koyama | University of Arizona | @Koyamawonders




Friday October 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay A

2:00pm

Participation and Inclusion in Digital Practices

Abstracts are available here: http://dml2016.dmlhub.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Participation-and-Inclusion-in-Digital-Practices-version-2.pdf, and are attached as a resource file below. 

Individual Session Research
65 Cultural Alignment Across Social Spheres and Differences in Adolescents’ Acquisition of (Technological) Human Capital
Cassidy Puckett Emory University @cassidycody

Individual Session Research
62 Digital Media, Disability, and the “Home Technology Divide”"
Meryl Alper | Northeastern University | @merylalper

Individual Session Research
84 Design, Connect, Learn: Best Practices for Building a Connected Open Online Course
Torrey Trust | University of Massachusetts Amherst | @torreytrust

Individual Session Research
148 A Mixed-Methods Study of College Students' Informal Learning on Facebook
Yiran Wang | University of California, Irvine | @yiranw2

Individual Session Research
199 Symbiosis Between Old and New Media in Online Quotation Culture
Kyle Booten | UC Berkeley

 


Speakers
avatar for Torrey Trust

Torrey Trust

Assistant Professor, UMass Amherst
My research focuses on how teachers use technology to enhance their own learning as well as their classroom practice. I am also interested in instructional design, 3D printing, makerspaces, and social media.



Friday October 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay B

2:00pm

Blazing the trail: Action Research and "Post-Emergent" Library Makerspaces

When you’re starting a youth makerspace in a library, you will encounter a set of common problems. They might include: how do we find and hire mentors? What kind of 3D printer or laser cutter should we buy? How do we design with youth input? Where do we find start-up funding? The questions that arise are well-defined because the path to starting a youth makerspace has been pounded flat by libraries that have gone before you, identifying and building resources to help you understand the common problems, needs, and challenges of starting a makerspace.

But four or five years later, when a library makerspace enters the ”post-emergent” phase, it encounters an entirely different set of issues and problems that go beyond hiring staff and purchasing equipment. Typically these problems aren’t easy to solve, and are highly nuanced. They might include: how do we get teens to move from hanging out to geeking out? How do we get buy-in from staff who work in other departments? How do we approach evaluation? This path has yet to be made, or established in an open, public way.

Since December 2015, five “post-emergent library youth makerspaces,” all connected to each other through the YOUmedia Learning Labs Network, have been engaging in action research that looks both institutionally inward, and across our community of practitioners and network of institutions to create this path. The YOUmedia Learning Labs Network, housed at the National Writing Project, brought together this group who included representatives from the Billings Public Library, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Lynn Public Library, Anythink Libraries, and the Free Library of Philadelphia. The goal of this action research/post-emergent initiative funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services is to identify the common issues that a library youth makerspace is likely to face in years four, five and beyond, through engaging in a cycle of regular observation, reflection, interventions, and iterations.

Identifying the potential problems that will arise on the road to being “post-emergent” is an essential key to the sustainability of a youth library makerspace. A blazed trail, versus a tangled forest, allows you to anticipate problems, versus being surprised by them. It allows your makerspace to grow and learn collaboratively, and move faster in response to your own community’s needs. It also frees up time to reflect, share, and contribute back to the larger library field and to the landscape of makerspaces in libraries. The Blazing the Trail DML program will introduce participants to the methods and framework that we used to guide us through this process, collaborating with and learning from colleagues in a community of practice. Though this group focused on improving professional development in library youth makerspaces, the potential for using action research and a community of practice model as a tool for problem solving and reflection is incredibly powerful, and applicable beyond the bookstacks to museum and classroom education.


Speakers
CA

Cody Allen

Young Adult/TECH Lab Librarian, Billings Public Library
MY

Mouahmong Yang

Studio Coordinator, Anythink Libraries


Friday October 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay C

2:00pm

Equity in Makerspaces: Creative Resource Movement
Makerspaces have been framed as a way to facilitate access to STEM because they provide an open platform for individuals to make -- on their own time and their own terms (Calabrese Barton, Tan, & Greenberg, 2016). Most makerspaces have porous boundaries allowing a more fluid movement of resources into and with the makerspace. However, the field lacks deep understanding of how youth from minoritized communities access, use, move, re-purpose and re-mix resources towards transformative ends in community-based makerspaces. 

We are concerned with how youth creatively leverage/move resources towards unveiling and legitimizing cultural knowledge & practice, power dynamics & inequality, and community concerns that were previously invisible, especially in the prototypical STEM and making worlds. This equity concern tied to resources is the focus of our session. 

The papers in this session raise new ideas and questions around how youth build understandings for themselves and others in STEM through making in new and powerful spaces.
- One paper examines the ways in which digital media tools and practices serve as sites of possibility for youth to creatively push against existing resources and to claim new positions (Kafai & Peppler, 2011). Videos emerged as moments of self-expression, deliberate moves to exhibit proof and ownership of knowledge/skills, and a desire to showcase solutions and unique expertise developed for community needs. For example, upon completing a light-up greeting card, one youth excitedly made a DIY “How To” video as a public display of his pride and a platform for him to make the process/practices accessible for his peers.
- Another study, co-authored with 3 researcher-makers, reports on youth-developed multimodal cases (Vasudevan, Schultz, & Bateman, 2010) to discuss critical understandings of science and engineering learning in/out of school. Youth articulated counternarratives (Solorzano & Yosso, 2002) challenging dominant ideologies about legitimate STEM participation. They connected personal, familial and broader community concerns in how youth identified problems and designed engineering solutions. The digital representations of their designs further layered these dimensions, creating opportunities for expansive learning (Engestrom & Sannino, 2010). For example, one participant’s prototype also became a potential therapy tool that merged her psychology and engineering interests. 
- A third paper examines the dialogic nature of youth/adult interactions that can in/directly influence youths’ making process in makerspaces. The authors explore how/when/why youth negotiate with adults, make decisions and negotiate for difference access points as they engage in making. This paper looks at the resources youth leverage to inform the design of their innovations (for example, a group who prototyped a motorized baby gate for an aunt who runs a home daycare). Insights from these negotiations provide data points for conjecturing what co-creating a community-based makerspace for underrepresented youth may entail.

All studies draw upon youth participatory methodologies, and take place in equity-oriented community-based makerspaces. Participating youth will join our session using Google Hangout. All studies draw upon fieldnotes/videos from multi-year participant observation, collection of youth-produced artifacts and interviews. Analysis involved constant comparative coding for iterative movement across data.

Speakers
CR

Christina Restrepo Nazar

Graduate Student, Michigan State University
ET

Edna Tan

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina, Greensboro


Friday October 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay E

2:00pm

HOMAGO Reloaded: Refections and New Research from the Digital Youth Project Team
Don’t miss a reunion of the researchers who brought you Hanging Out Messing Around and Geeking Out, reflecting on developments and new research in the decade since the Digital Youth Project began its research. The Digital Youth Project was a unique interdisciplinary collaboration that included 25 researchers and 22 case ethnographic case studies of youth new media practices during the heyday of MySpace and LiveJournal and when machimima and YouTube were just being vaulted into mainstream visibility. Mimi Ito will moderate a discussion with former Digital Youth researchers Rachel Cody, Becky Herr, Heather Horst, C.J. Pascoe, Christo Sims, and Lisa Tripp. How have youth living and learning online changed in the decade since the Digital Youth Project began it’s investigation? How have researchers who collaborated on this project extended this earlier research and found new settings for investigation and application?  This is an opportunity to trace the lasting influence of collaborative research and project based learning as emerging researchers develop as scholars, innovators, and change agents. Hear about Cody’s study of Harry Potter fans on Ravelry. com; Sims’ application of HOMAGO insights in undergraduate education and design interventions; Herr’s Maker-Ed workshops with LA Makerspace; Horst’s international work on transmedia literacy; Pascoe’s study of GLBTQ coming of age stories across generations; and Tripp’s innovations in film and digital arts education at in higher education.

Speakers
avatar for Becky Herr Stephenson

Becky Herr Stephenson

Dr. Becky Herr Stephenson is a researcher focused on teaching and learning with popular culture and technology. She earned her Ph.D. from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California in 2008. Becky is co-author of two books, Teaching Harry Potter: The Power of Imagination in Multicultural Classrooms (2011, Palgrave MacMillan) and Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New... Read More →


Friday October 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny Ballroom

3:00pm

Break
A brief break before your 60 minute session!

Friday October 7, 2016 3:00pm - 3:15pm
TBA

3:15pm

Digital Citizenship: Creating Culture in Context

Digital citizenship, the idea of being a safe, responsible and respectful user of media and technology, is a foundational principle of 21st century learning. To successfully navigate the online world, youth need the digital citizenship related skills and understandings of how to use media and technology to enhance their lives and be smart consumers and producers of information.  One issue is that the topic is so broad that it can be difficult to pinpoint who is responsible for conveying the concepts and necessary skills. Teachers? Parents? Mentors? The opportunity and obligation is ripe for all of the above. To integrate digital citizenship as part of youth culture, positive examples of social media, incentives to do the right thing, and direct instruction on relevant skills must be woven into the context of everyday life, not just isolated in a technology classroom.  This session will focus on why, where and how positive online expectations can be imparted in an engaging and authentic manner. We will discuss how intentional integration efforts are, in fact, more effective than standalone instructional lessons and could potentially act synergistically in ways to build culture and trust among community members.

Panelists include Vanessa Monterosa, Doctoral Candidate from the California State University, Long Beach, who will provide the research foundation for the panel by sharing her dissertation work on the analysis of digital citizenship efforts and why it is important to embed them across instruction rather than treat digital citizenship as a separate subject.  Her work examines efforts from an organizational leadership perspective and will provide a context for the discussion. April Moore, Director of Educational Technology at Corona-Norco Unified School District, will describe the work her district is doing to embed digital citizenship across her district population through a comprehensive badging system.  Corona-Norco Unified School District is the world’s largest issuer of digital badges using the Mozilla Open Badge Infrastructure (OBI) and is committed to making digital citizenship a foundational part of their student education efforts, as well as a part of their staff and parent culture. Through the district’s badging system design, demonstration of digital citizenship skills unlock the opportunity for students to level-up in technology access upon certification. Keegan Korf, Lead Teacher of Digital Citizenship for Omaha Public Schools, is partnering with Do Space, a youth technology space in Omaha which promotes a “Technology for Everyone” mission.  Keegan’s approach began by offering parents sessions on Digital Footprints, Selfie Culture, and Cyberbullying. Working with Do Space, Keegan provides relevant programming for parents who are watching their children grow up in the digital landscape to allay the fears that comes along with raising kids in this digital age. Parents are provided with knowledge and resources, but also a space to talk with other parents facing the same concerns as them. Sue Thotz, Program Manager for Common Sense Education works with both K-12 schools and after-school organizations within the Los Angeles region to create a culture of digital citizenship among youth. Sue will be sharing resources and examples of organizations that have proactively used a project-based approach to student media creation on digital citizenship issues.

Speakers
SH

Steven Hickman

TSA, Corona Norco Unified School District
avatar for Keegan Korf

Keegan Korf

Lead Teacher, Digital Citizenship | Omaha Education Project Coordinator, Omaha Public Schools | Common Sense Media
Lead Teacher, Digital Citizenship | Omaha Public Schools | Omaha Education Project Manager | @CommonSenseEdu | #MIEExpert | #digcit
avatar for April Moore

April Moore

Director, Corona Norco Unified School District
Dr. Moore holds an Ed.D. from USC with an emphasis in K-12 Leadership in Urban Settings. She has a passion for educational technology, literacy, leadership, and mentoring. As the Director of Educational Technology in Corona-Norco USD, she oversees the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) pilot, the digital badging program, and is leading a team to launch an online school in Fall 2017.
avatar for Sue Thotz

Sue Thotz

Los Angeles Education Manager, Common Sense
I'm the Los Angeles Program Manager for Common Sense Education supporting educators and parents to help kids thrive in a world of tech. I've been teaching in the classroom, the cell culture lab, after-school spaces, and more. I love to talk digital citizenship, ed tech integration, and the value of unbiased, independent, trustworthy information to support teachers.


Friday October 7, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Emerald Bay C

3:15pm

Making Meaning: Invitation to make in theory & practice

This panel explores making from theory to practice, offering ways to think about making as support for emerging ideas, building worlds, and even repairing the world.
- The first presenter brings Elaine Scarry’s unmaking/making framework into conversation with Plato’s explanation of “making” (poeisis) to propose a rhetorically-invested approach to making. In her book The Body in Pain, Elaine Scarry argues that pain does more than resist linguistic expression, it “actively destroys it, bringing about an immediate reversion to a state anterior to language” (4). Pain unmakes the world. In response, making—artifacts, art, texts—can be a means of repair. Scarry’s examples of making include the construction of artifacts designed to take over the body’s labor or act as an extension to the self, including everyday objects, like chairs. The first presenter adds to this understanding by considering texts, digital and otherwise, that can indeed make the world. “Repairing the world” does not suggest that people can be simply healed or fixed or that the torturer’s damage can ever be undone; rather, through examples of making in the midst of destruction, the first speaker illuminates the possibilities for making the violence of rhetoric part of a process of repair.
- The second presenter explores making in relation to teachers’ professional development, specifically teachers at a site of the National Writing Project. The presenter shares program design that welcomes language arts teachers into the world of making. Inviting language arts teachers to make—hacking notebooks, inventing with MaKey MaKey, or exploring 3D printing—has created an affinity group (Gee) who build connections between the making of literacies and the making of artifacts. Through participation in maker culture, teachers reimagine what it means to fail and what counts as meaning making for themselves and their students.
- The third presenter explores the work of students who participate in a scientific inquiry class. The students make artifacts as a way to represent their emerging scientific ideas. However, the students are not making in response to an assignment, but instead describe feeling “compelled” to go home and make as a way to understand science and also as a means for sharing their nascent scientific ideas with their peers.  The presenter talks through the notion of emergent ideas (emerging as you play with things) and the affordance and constraints offered by the every day materials students use. The student artifacts offer a move away from ""maker as a disposition” to maker as a way to make meaning and content. It’s not just “maker” stuff (like rockets we make in hands-on science labs), but making woven into the ways in which ideas are developed and furthered.
- Across all the presenters, we think about the potential of making to invite participation and value a diversity of ways to make meaning. We intend to support participation in this session—and embrace maker culture—by asking the panel and participants to make artifacts, notes, tweets, mind maps, etc., as we work through the ideas in the session. We see this session as offering both research and models for our work, weaving theory and practice.


Speakers
avatar for Kim Jaxon

Kim Jaxon

Associate Professor, Composition & Literacy, CSU, Chico
I'm an associate professor of English (Composition & Literacy) at California State University, Chico. My research interests focus on theories of literacy, particularly digital literacies, the teaching of writing, participation, course design, and teacher education. In my research and my teaching, I use a variety of digital platforms and consider the affordances in terms of student learning and participation. I'm also a gamer and a self proclaimed... Read More →
avatar for Peter Kittle

Peter Kittle

Director, Northern California Writing Project
Peter Kittle is Professor of English at California State University, Chico, where he directs the Northern California Writing Project (NCWP). Offering professional development on a wide variety of literacy-centered topics, the NCWP especially focuses on content-area literacy, technology and literacy, and maker-education literacy. Kittle has presented on making electronically-hacked notebooks, using systems thinking theories to understand... Read More →
avatar for Laura Sparks

Laura Sparks

Assistant Professor, California State University, Chico


Friday October 7, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Emerald Bay B

3:15pm

Making Waves: Getting in the flow to build, design, and solve for youth engagement

Today’s youth need more agency over their learning than ever before, yet intentional connecting learning opportunities remain elusive.  This session profiles three unique youth engagement programs that are rapidly evolving to produce platforms that allow youth to control both program outcomes and career trajectories.

Learn how a Science Center in the middle of the country is BUILDing an agriculture exhibit that is interest-powered.  Understand how a Presidential Foundation on the west coast has DESIGNed an experiential and academically-oriented national leadership development program in Washington, DC. Examine how a University Newsroom is researching and trying to SOLVE the national issue of ethical journalism in the face of digital media.  Hard to imagine the connection?  It’s because we need to reimagine how young people learn.  

LET’S BUILD: The Saint Louis Science Center is building a multi-million dollar indoor/outdoor agriculture exhibition that incorporates youth in its program design, interpretation, and the operation of an onsite greenhouse and hydroponics lab focused on urban agriculture. Addressing the issue of food deserts in St. Louis as part of the Youth Exploring Science (YES) Program, teens are able to cultivate DIY agriculture and create their own mini farmers markets. They also engage their peers from across the city at community recreation centers using a mentor-based model for learning.

LET’S DESIGN: Real History. Real Leaders. Real World.  The Reagan Foundation is designing an experiential university course, Leadership and the American Presidency (LTAP).  Reaching outside the traditional scope of museum education, LTAP is situated in the nation’s capital and aims to develop student leaders through the hallmark lens of the Presidential Leadership Journey.  Paralleling the leadership development journey of young people, LTAP utilizes historical sites, prominent speakers, reflective practice, and authentic real-world assessment.    - LTAP isn’t just designed for young people. It is designed with youth people.  Students are empowered as co-creators, leveraging their peer-supported network to ensure the program honors their learning interests, and prepares them for success in civic life.

LET’S SOLVE: Student newsrooms were traditionally spaces for students to learn storytelling using words, images and creative design. But nothing about journalism is as it once was, including ethics. As news has migrated to a digital platform supported by the legs of social media, student journalists are truly becoming story nomads. These nomads follow a story with passion and conviction with less need for a physical space to learn and share. However, their ethics, too, may be left wandering. Rather than blame technology, the Pepperdine University student newsroom is seeking to use social media to increase and create an innovative and dynamic system of media ethics. More importantly storytelling on social media platforms can create ethical journalism providing stories of hope and solutions.

CONNECTED: The panelists are practitioner-scholars who share learning from Pepperdine’s Education Technology Doctoral Program and a commitment to social learning, equity of opportunity, and theory-driven youth participation.  The learning landscape for youth is evolving rapidly and providers of youth learning opportunities will learn creative ways to link them together in cohesive ways.



Friday October 7, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Emerald Bay A

3:15pm

Identity Making In Online Spaces

Abstracts are available here: http://dml2016.dmlhub.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Identity-Making-In-Online-Spaces.pdf and are attached as a resource file below. 

240 - Individual Session Research

"#QueeringThePresent, #QueryingTheFuture: Digital queer gestures on twitter, transforming discourses, and performativities of new possible futures
Jose Lizarraga | UC Berkeley | @sapoverde
Arturo Cortez | UC Berkeley | @FineArturo

48 - Individual Session Research
Tumblr is a Place to Express Myself”: Digital Design Considerations for Queer Youth of Color Activism
Alexander Cho | UC Irvine

69 - Individual Session Research
Adolescents' Experiences of Co-Constructed Identity on Social Media
Susannah Stern | University of San Diego
Olivia Gonzalez | University of San Diego

112 - Individual Session Research
First in our Families: First generation college students, storytelling, and equity
Jane Van Galen | University of Washington Bothell | @jvg

 




Friday October 7, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Emerald Bay E

3:15pm

Generating Alternative Stories: Using fictional narratives to build STEM identity, interest, and community for non-dominant girls
There is an increasing need to develop digital literacy and computational fluency for all young people such that there is equal opportunity for participation in the growing number of STEM-related careers, but there remains a critical underrepresentation of women--especially those from non-dominant populations. Although programs for girls are on the rise, females continue to perceive challenges related to lack of prior experiences and sense of fit with existing activities communities. The Digital Youth Divas (DYD) is an out-of-school program that uses narrative stories to launch the creation of digital artifacts and support non-dominant middle school girls’ STEM interests and identities through virtual and real-world community. In this presentation, we will discuss an exploratory and innovative approach of using fictional stories to engage girls in STEM practice and community. Presentations will include this work from different lenses including theoretical, design, implementation, and outcomes. 
Theoretical: Using narrative stories as a situational STEM interest and identity resource.  Storylines have implications for learner’s perceptions of themselves and their abilities, and for the types of identities youth are afforded access to within learning environments (Nasir et al, 2012). The use of fictional stories is inspired by research in gaming and educational platforms that has found narratives capable of increasing motivation and interest for domain-specific topics and tasks (e.g. Plant, 2009, NSF, 2003, Baker & Leary, 1995). We hypothesize the use of DYD stories as material and ideational identity resources (Nasir & Cooks, 2009) that can trigger situational interest, the first phase of interest categorized as being dependent on environmental factors (Hidi & Renninger, 2006). 
Design: Collaborative process of developing multimedia narratives for learning. The narrative was co-designed by girls in a pilot program, written by professional children’s authors, and brought to life by professional media producers. Narratives center around a group of non-stereotypical characters that are students in a parallel universe middle school DYD club. Characters use technical language related to STEM concepts and encounter situations that require the creation of a physical artifact or written solution. To support multiple learning modalities and opportunities for exploration and connection, the narratives are available in various formats, including video animations and comic books.
Implementation: Incorporating narratives into the program structure and carrying out in practice. The interactive narrative unfolds on the DYD online platform. Each week girls launch an episode and are prompted to engage in project-based work mirroring what characters are doing. The girls solve challenges by submitting work online and communicate with virtual characters through online messages. We will share experiences from actual program implementation, including evidence of successes and challenges in the field.
Outcomes: Girls’ perceptions and interest development. Results from our work suggest that the use of narratives can spark discussions regarding race and identity and have the potential to anchor situational interest in STEM learning. We will share participant reflections on the narrative stories, pre and post survey results that compare girls’ perceptions of who should learn computing, and case studies of individual learner experiences.


Friday October 7, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Doheny Ballroom

3:15pm

Transforming Teaching with Technology
Technology has become ubiquitous in American schools, but the proliferation of technology has not universally contributed to improved student learning, or to the narrowing of the achievement gap. Indeed, recent research has shown that increased technology in the classroom may not lead to improved student outcomes (OECD). A critical component to the utility of technology in the classroom is the knowledge and practices of teachers. Teacher professional development then becomes an important component in improving teacher practice using technology, but how can professional development best support teacher learning? In this session we present four studies examining teacher professional development and the use of technology tools and resources. The first study examines how professional development including face-to-face meetings, webinars, and coaching visits supported teacher use of the Smithsonian Learning Lab (SLL). The SLL is a digital content portal, where teachers and students can search, organize, and annotate over 1.4 million digitized Smithsonian artifacts, and create their own learning collections. The second study investigates how online learning was leveraged to increase the reach of the Equitable Science Curriculum for Integrating Arts in Public Education (ESCAPE). ESCAPE was designed to support elementary school teacher science instruction through visual and performing arts, and inquiry, as innovative ways for students to learn science. The third study examines how a researcher-practitioner coaching partnership was used to build teacher capacity in the use of Live Ink, a digital visual syntactic text formatting tool that facilitates student reading and writing. The final study focuses on Digicom, a program that involves preparing teachers and students across all areas of K-12 curriculum to make videos in order to communicate in the 21st Century. Within this project, we examine how professional development supports teacher instruction of digital storytelling. Each study individually and all studies collectively produced important lessons about how to prepare and support teachers in using technology in the classroom. Collectively, we find that positioning teachers as learners, understanding teachers’ classroom contexts, and attending to their problems of practice promote teacher learning. Challenges, successes, and implications for researchers and practitioners will be shared.

Speakers
NG

Nicole Gilbertson

Site Director, UCI History Project
JK

Jenell Krishnan

Graduate Student Researcher, School of Education, ICI
DV

David Vogel

CEO, DIGICOM
JY

Joanna Yau

Doctoral Student, UCI, School of Education


Friday October 7, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Pacific Ballroom A

4:15pm

Break
Wahoo! It's almost time for the Ignites!

Friday October 7, 2016 4:15pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:30pm

Ignites and Closing Remarks
Official Ignite Talks! 

Ignite Talks will be hosted by Gardner Campbell and will take place Thursday, October 6, 2016 and Friday, October 7, 2016.

Friday, October 7, 2016 

Laurel Felt, University of Southern California
Remi Kalir, University of Colorado Denver
Nick Ross, University of Minnesota
Rhianon Gutierrez, Boston Public Schools
Kate Green, University of Nottingham, UK




Friday October 7, 2016 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Doheny Ballroom

6:00pm

Shuttle Pick Up: UCI to Hotel Irvine/Fairmont (Loop)
A charter shuttle will pick up from the side of Aldrich Hall (by the flag poles). The shuttle will depart promptly at 6:00 PM and will stop at the Hotel Irvine and Fairmont Newport Beach. 

Friday October 7, 2016 6:00pm - 6:30pm
Aldrich Hall (By Flagpoles)